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Genesis 48:21

    Genesis 48:21 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Israel said unto Joseph, Behold, I die: but God shall be with you, and bring you again unto the land of your fathers.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Israel said to Joseph, Behold, I die: but God shall be with you, and bring you again to the land of your fathers.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Israel said unto Joseph, Behold, I die: but God will be with you, and bring you again unto the land of your fathers.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then Israel said to Joseph, Now my death is near; but God will be with you, guiding you back to the land of your fathers.

    Webster's Revision

    And Israel said unto Joseph, Behold, I die: but God will be with you, and bring you again unto the land of your fathers.

    World English Bible

    Israel said to Joseph, "Behold, I am dying, but God will be with you, and bring you again to the land of your fathers.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Israel said unto Joseph, Behold, I die: but God shall be with you, and bring you again unto the land of your fathers.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 48:21

    Behold, I die - With what composure is this most awful word expressed! Surely of Jacob it might be now said, "He turns his sight undaunted on the tomb;" for though it is not said that he was full of days, as were Abraham and Isaac, yet he is perfectly willing to bid adieu to earthly things, and lay his body in the grave. Could any person act as the patriarchs did in their last moments, who had no hopes of eternal life, no belief in the immortality of the soul? Impossible! With such a conviction of the being of God, with such proofs of his tenderness and regard, with such experience of his providential and miraculous interference in their behalf, could they suppose that they were only creatures of a day, and that God had wasted so much care, attention, providence, grace, and goodness, on creatures who were to be ultimately like the beasts that perish? The supposition that they could have no correct notion of the immortality of the soul is as dishonorable to God as to themselves. But what shall we think of Christians who have formed this hypothesis into a system to prove what? Why, that the patriarchs lived and died in the dark! That either the soul has no immortality, or that God has not thought proper to reveal it. Away with such an opinion! It cannot be said to merit serious refutation.

    Wesley's Notes on Genesis 48:21

    48:21 I die, but God shall be with you, and bring you again - This assurance was given them, and carefully preserved among them, that they might neither love Egypt too much when it favoured them, nor fear it too much when it frowned upon them. These words of Jacob furnish us with comfort in reference to the death of our friends: But God shall be with us, and his gracious presence is sufficient to make up the loss. They leave us, but he will never fail us. He will bring us to the land of our fathers, the heavenly Canaan, whither our godly fathers are gone before us. If God be with us while we stay behind in this world, and will receive us shortly to be with them that are gone before to a better world, we ought not to sorrow as those that have no hope.