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Genesis 49:22

    Genesis 49:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Joseph is a fruitful bough, even a fruitful bough by a well; whose branches run over the wall:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Joseph is a fruitful bough, even a fruitful bough by a well; whose branches run over the wall:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Joseph is a fruitful bough, A fruitful bough by a fountain; His branches run over the wall.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Joseph is a young ox, whose steps are turned to the fountain;

    Webster's Revision

    Joseph is a fruitful bough, A fruitful bough by a fountain; His branches run over the wall.

    World English Bible

    "Joseph is a fruitful vine, a fruitful vine by a spring. His branches run over the wall.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Joseph is a fruitful bough, A fruitful bough by a fountain; His branches run over the wall.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 49:22

    The sum of a fruitful vine - This appears to me to refer to Jacob himself, who was blessed with such a numerous posterity that in two hundred and fifteen years after this his own descendants amounted to upwards of 600,000 effective men; and the figures here are intended to point out the continual growth and increase of his posterity. Jacob was a fruitful tree planted by a fountain, which because it was good would yield good fruit; and because it was planted near a fountain, from being continually watered, would be perpetually fruitful. The same is used and applied to Jacob, Deuteronomy 33:28 : The Fountain Of Jacob shall be upon a land of corn, and wine, etc.

    The daughters, בנות banoth, put here for branches, shoot over or run upon the wall - Alluding probably to the case of the vine, which requires to be supported by a wall, trees, etc. Some commentators have understood this literally, and have applied it to the Egyptian women, who were so struck with the beauty of Joseph as to get upon walls, the tops of houses, etc., to see him as he passed by. This is agreeable to the view taken of the subject by the Koran. See Clarke on Genesis 39:6 (note).

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 49:22

    Jacob had doubtless been made acquainted with the history of his beloved son Joseph from the time of his disappearance until he met him on the borders of Egypt. It had been the meditation and the wonder of his last seventeen years. When he comes to Joseph, therefore, the mingled emotions of affection and gratitude burst forth from his heart in language that cannot be restrained by the ordinary rules of speech. The first thing connected with Joseph in the patriarch's mind is fruitfulness. The image is vivid and striking. "Son of a fruitful tree." A branch or rather a shoot transplanted from the parent stem. "By a well;" from which it may draw the water of life. "Whose daughters" - luxuriant branches. Run over a wall - transcend all the usual boundaries of a well-enclosed garden. This fruitfulness attaches to Joseph in two respects. First, he is the prudent gatherer and the inexhaustible dispenser of the produce of Egypt, by which the lives of his father and brethren were preserved. And then he is in prospect the twofold tribe, that bursts the bounds assigned to a twelfth of the chosen people, and overspreads the area of two tribes.

    Wesley's Notes on Genesis 49:22

    49:22 Joseph is a fruitful bough, or young tree, for God had made him fruitful in the land of his affliction, as branches of a vine, or other spreading plant, running over the wall.