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Genesis 5:28

    Genesis 5:28 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Lamech lived an hundred eighty and two years, and begat a son:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Lamech lived an hundred eighty and two years, and begat a son:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Lamech lived a hundred eighty and two years, and begat a son:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And Lamech was a hundred and eighty-two years old when he had a son:

    Webster's Revision

    And Lamech lived a hundred eighty and two years, and begat a son:

    World English Bible

    Lamech lived one hundred eighty-two years, and became the father of a son,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Lamech lived an hundred eighty and two years, and begat a son:

    Definitions for Genesis 5:28

    Begat - To bear; to bring forth.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 5:28

    In the biography of Lamek the name of his son is not only given, but the reason of it is assigned. The parents were cumbered with the toil of cultivating the ground. They looked forward with hope to the aid or relief which their son would give them in bearing the burden of life, and they express this hope in his name. In stating the reason of the name, they employ a word which is connected with it only by a second remove. נוּח nûach and נחם nācham are stems not immediately connected; but they both point back to a common root נח (n-ch) signifying "to sigh, to breathe, to rest, to lie down."

    This is only another recorded instance of the habit of giving names indicative of the thoughts of the parents at the time of the child's birth. All names were originally significant, and have still to this day an import. Some were given at birth, others at later periods, from some remarkable circumstance in the individual's life. Hence, many characters of ancient times were distinguished by several names conferred at different times and for different reasons. The reason of the present name is put on record simply on account of the extraordinary destiny which awaited the bearer of it.

    Which the Lord hath cursed. - Here is another incidental allusion to the second document, without which it would not be intelligible. If the present document had been intended to stand alone, this remark would have had its explanation in some previous part of the narrative.