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Genesis 6:6

    Genesis 6:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And it repented the LORD that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him at his heart.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And it repented the LORD that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him at his heart.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And it repented Jehovah that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him at his heart.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the Lord had sorrow because he had made man on the earth, and grief was in his heart.

    Webster's Revision

    And it repented Jehovah that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him at his heart.

    World English Bible

    Yahweh was sorry that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him in his heart.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And it repented the LORD that he had made man on the earth, and it grieved him at his heart.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 6:6

    And it repented the Lord - that he had made man. The Scripture is frank and unreserved; some people would say, imprudent or regardless of misconstruction, in its statements of truth. Repentance ascribed to the Lord seems to imply wavering or change of purpose in the Eternal Self-existent One. But the sublime dictate of the inspired word is, "God is not a man, that he should lie; neither the son of man, that he should repent: hath he said and shall he not do it? or hath he spoken and shall he not make it good?" Numbers 23:19. In sooth, every act here recorded - the observation, the resolve, the exception - seems equally with the repentance to jar with the unchangeableness of God. To go to the root of the matter, every act of the divine will, of creative power, or of interference with the order of nature, seems at variance with inflexibility of purpose. But, in the first place, man has a finite mind and a limited sphere of observation, and therefore is not able to conceive or express thoughts or acts exactly as they are in God, but only as they are in himself. Secondly, God is a spirit, and therefore has the attributes of personality, freedom, and holiness; and the passage before us is designed to set forth these in all the reality of their action, and thereby to distinguish the freedom of the eternal mind from the fatalism of inert matter. Hence, thirdly, these statements represent real processes of the Divine Spirit, analogous at least to those of the human. And, lastly, to verify this representation, it is not necessary that we should be able to comprehend or construe to ourselves in all its practical detail that sublime harmony which subsists between the liberty and the immutability of God. That change of state which is essential to will, liberty, and activity, may be, for aught we know, and from what we know must be, in profound unison with the eternity of the divine purpose.