Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Genesis 7:10

    Genesis 7:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And it came to pass after seven days, that the waters of the flood were upon the earth.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And it came to pass after seven days, that the waters of the flood were on the earth.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And it came to pass after the seven days, that the waters of the flood were upon the earth.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And after the seven days, the waters came over all the earth.

    Webster's Revision

    And it came to pass after the seven days, that the waters of the flood were upon the earth.

    World English Bible

    It happened after the seven days, that the waters of the flood came on the earth.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And it came to pass after the seven days, that the waters of the flood were upon the earth.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 7:10

    - XXV. The Flood

    The date is here given, at which the flood commenced and the entrance into the ark was completed. "In seven days." On the seventh day from the command. "In the second month." The primeval year commenced about the autumnal equinox; we may say, on the nearest new moon. The rains began about a month or six weeks after the equinox, and, consequently, not far from the seventeenth of the second month. "All the fountains of the great deep, and the windows of the skies." It appears that the deluge was produced by a gradual commotion of nature on a grand scale. The gathering clouds were dissolved into incessant showers. But this was not sufficient of itself to effect the overwhelming desolation that followed. The beautiful figure of the windows of the skies being opened is preceded by the equally striking one of the fountains of the great deep being broken up. This was the chief source of the flood. A change in the level of the land was accomplished. That which had emerged from the waters on the third day of the last creation was now again submerged. The waters of the great deep now broke their bounds, flowed in on the sunken surface, and drowned the world of man, with all its inhabitants. The accompanying heavy rain of forty days and nights was, in reality, only a subsidiary instrument in the deluging of the land. We may imagine the sinking of the land to have been so gradual as to occupy the whole of these forty days of rain. There is an awful magnificence in this constant uplifting of the billows over the yielding land.