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Genesis 7:19

    Genesis 7:19 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the waters prevailed exceedingly upon the earth; and all the high hills, that were under the whole heaven, were covered.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the waters prevailed exceedingly on the earth; and all the high hills, that were under the whole heaven, were covered.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And the waters prevailed exceedingly upon the earth; and all the high mountains that were under the whole heaven were covered.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the waters overcame everything on the earth; and all the mountains under heaven were covered.

    Webster's Revision

    And the waters prevailed exceedingly upon the earth; and all the high mountains that were under the whole heaven were covered.

    World English Bible

    The waters prevailed exceedingly on the earth. All the high mountains that were under the whole sky were covered.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the waters prevailed exceedingly upon the earth; and all the high mountains that were under the whole heaven were covered.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 7:19

    Upon the land. - The land is to be understood of the portion of the earth's surface known to man. This, with an unknown margin beyond it, was covered with the waters. But this is all that Scripture warrants us to assert. Concerning the distant parts of Europe, the continents of Africa, America, or Australia, we can say nothing. "All the high hills were covered." Not a hill was above water within the horizon of the spectator or of man. There were ten generations from Adam to Noah inclusive. We cannot tell what the rate of increase was. But, supposing each couple to have ten children, and therefore the common ratio to be five, the whole number of births would be about five million, and the population in the time of Noah less than four million. It is probable that they did not scatter further than the necessities and conveniences of life demanded. In a fertile region, an area equal to that of the British Isles would be amply sufficient for four million men, women, and children.

    Let us suppose, then, a circle of five hundred miles in diameter inhabited by man. Let this occupy the central region of a concentric circle of eight hundred miles in diameter. With a center a little southwest of Mosul, this larger circle would reach fifty miles into the Mediterranean, the Euxine, and the Caspian, and would probably have touched the Persian Gulf at the time of the deluge. If this region were covered with water, it is obvious that no land or mountain would be visible to a spectator within the inner circle of five hundred miles in diameter. "Fifteen cubits upward." This was half the depth of the ark. It may have taken this draught of water to float it. If so, its grounding on a hill under water would indicate the depth of water on its summit. The gradual rise of the waters was accomplished by the depression of the land, aided, possibly, by a simultaneous elevation of the bed of the ocean. The water, by the mere necessity of finding its level, overflowed the former dry land. The extent of this oscillation of the solid crust of the earth is paralleled by the changes of level which geology indicates, the last of which took place at the time of the six days' creation. It is possible that most of the land that was then raised was now again temporarily submerged in the returning waters; while distant continents may have all along existed, which never came within the ken of antediluvian man. The sobriety and historical veracity of the narrative are strikingly exhibited in the moderate height to which the waters are said to have risen above the ancient hills.