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Genesis 9:21

    Genesis 9:21 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And he drank of the wine, and was drunken; and he was uncovered within his tent.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And he drank of the wine, and was drunken; and he was uncovered within his tent.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and he drank of the wine, and was drunken. And he was uncovered within his tent.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And he took of the wine of it and was overcome by drink; and he was uncovered in his tent.

    Webster's Revision

    and he drank of the wine, and was drunken. And he was uncovered within his tent.

    World English Bible

    He drank of the wine and got drunk. He was uncovered within his tent.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and he drank of the wine, and was drunken; and he was uncovered within his tent.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 9:21

    He drank of the wine, etc. - It is very probable that this was the first time the wine was cultivated; and it is as probable that the strength or intoxicating power of the expressed juice was never before known. Noah, therefore, might have drunk it at this time without the least blame, as he knew not till this trial the effects it would produce. I once knew a case which I believe to be perfectly parallel. A person who had scarcely ever heard of cider, and whose beverage through his whole life had been only milk or water, coming wet and very much fatigued to a farmer's house in Somersetshire, begged for a little water or milk. The good woman of the house, seeing him very much exhausted, kindly said, "I will give you a little cider, which will do you more good." The honest man, understanding no more of cider than merely that it was the simple juice of apples, after some hesitation drank about a half pint of it; the consequence was, that in less than half an hour he was perfectly intoxicated, and could neither speak plain nor walk! This case I myself witnessed. A stranger to the circumstances, seeing this person, would pronounce him drunk; and perhaps at a third hand he might be represented as a drunkard, and thus his character be blasted; while of the crime of drunkenness he was as innocent as an infant.

    This I presume to have been precisely the case with Noah; and no person without an absolute breach of every rule of charity and candour, can attach any blame to the character of Noah on this ground, unless from a subsequent account they were well assured that, knowing the power and effects of the liquor, he had repeated the act. Some expositors seem to be glad to fix on a fact like this, which by their distortion becomes a crime; and then, in a strain of sympathetic tenderness, affect to deplore "the failings and imperfections of the best of men;" when, from the interpretation that should be given of the place, neither failing nor imperfection can possibly appear.