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Genesis 9:28

    Genesis 9:28 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Noah lived after the flood three hundred and fifty years.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Noah lived after the flood three hundred and fifty years.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Noah lived after the flood three hundred and fifty years.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And Noah went on living three hundred and fifty years after the great flow of waters;

    Webster's Revision

    And Noah lived after the flood three hundred and fifty years.

    World English Bible

    Noah lived three hundred fifty years after the flood.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Noah lived after the flood three hundred and fifty years.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 9:28

    The history of Noah is now closed, in the customary form of the fifth chapter. This marks a connection between the third and fourth documents, and points to one hand as the composer, or at least compiler, of both. The document now closed could not have had the last paragraph appended to it until after the death of Noah. But, with the exception of these two verses, it might have been composed hundreds of years before. This strongly favors the notion of a constant continuator, or, at all events, continuation of the sacred history. Every new prophet and inspired writer whom God raised up added the necessary portion and made the necessary insertions in the sacred record. And hence, the Word of God had a progressive growth and adaptation to the successive ages of the church.

    The present document stands between the old world and the new world. Hence, it has a double character, being the close of the antediluvian history, and the introduction to that of the postdiluvian race. It records a great event, pregnant with warning to all future generations of men. And it notes the delegation, by God to man, of authority to punish the murderer by death, and therefore to enforce all the minor sanctions of law for breaches of the civil compact. It therefore points out the institution of civil government as coming from God, and clearly exhibits the accountability of all governments to God for all the powers they hold, and for the mode in which they are exercised. This also is a great historical lesson for all ages.