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Genesis 9:6

    Genesis 9:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Whoever sheds man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed: For in the image of God made he man.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Whoever takes a man's life, by man will his life be taken; because God made man in his image.

    Webster's Revision

    Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed: For in the image of God made he man.

    World English Bible

    Whoever sheds man's blood, his blood will be shed by man, for God made man in his own image.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 9:6

    Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood - Hence it appears that whoever kills a man, unless unwittingly, as the Scripture expresses it, shall forfeit his own life.

    A man is accused of the crime of murder; of this crime he is guilty or he is not: if he be guilty of murder he should die; if not, let him be punished according to the demerit of his crime; but for no offense but murder should he lose his life. Taking away the life of another is the highest offense that can be committed against the individual, and against society; and the highest punishment that a man can suffer for such a crime is the loss of his own life. As punishment should be ever proportioned to crimes, so the highest punishment due to the highest crime should not be inflicted for a minor offense. The law of God and the eternal dictates of reason say, that if a man kill another, the loss of his own life is at once the highest penalty he can pay, and an equivalent for his offense as far as civil society is concerned. If the death of the murderer be the highest penalty he can pay for the murder he has committed, then the infliction of this punishment for any minor offense is injustice and cruelty; and serves only to confound the claims of justice, the different degrees of moral turpitude and vice, and to render the profligate desperate: hence the adage so frequent among almost every order of delinquents, "It is as good to be hanged for a sheep as a lamb;" which at once marks their desperation, and the injustice of those penal laws which inflict the highest punishment for almost every species of crime. When shall a wise and judicious legislature see the absurdity and injustice of inflicting the punishment of death for stealing a sheep or a horse, forging a twenty shillings' note, and Murdering A Man; when the latter, in its moral turpitude and ruinous consequences, infinitely exceeds the others?* (* On this head the doctor's pious wish has been realized since this paragraph was written. - Publishers)