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Habakkuk 2:9

    Habakkuk 2:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Woe to him that coveteth an evil covetousness to his house, that he may set his nest on high, that he may be delivered from the power of evil!

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Woe to him that covets an evil covetousness to his house, that he may set his nest on high, that he may be delivered from the power of evil!

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Woe to him that getteth an evil gain for his house, that he may set his nest on high, that he may be delivered from the hand of evil!

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    A curse on him who gets evil profits for his family, so that he may put his resting-place on high and be safe from the hand of the wrongdoer!

    Webster's Revision

    Woe to him that getteth an evil gain for his house, that he may set his nest on high, that he may be delivered from the hand of evil!

    World English Bible

    Woe to him who gets an evil gain for his house, that he may set his nest on high, that he may be delivered from the hand of evil!

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Woe to him that getteth an evil gain for his house, that he may set his nest on high, that he may be delivered from the hand of evil!

    Definitions for Habakkuk 2:9

    Woe - An expression of grief or indignation.

    Clarke's Commentary on Habakkuk 2:9

    An evil covetousness to his house - Nebuchadnezzar wished to aggrandize his family, and make his empire permanent: but both family and empire were soon cut off by the death of his son Belshazzar, and the consequent destruction of the Chaldean empire.

    Barnes' Notes on Habakkuk 2:9

    Woe to him that coveteth an evil covetousness to his house - (or, with accents, "that coveteth covetousness or unjust gain, an evil to his house.") What man coveteth seems gain, but is evil "to his house" after him, destroying both himself and his whole family or race with him . "That he may set his nest on high," as an eagle, to which he had likened the Chaldee (Habakkuk 1:8. Compare Jeremiah 20:16). A pagan called "strongholds, the nests of tyrants." The nest was placed "on high" which means also "heaven," as it is said, Obadiah 1:4, "though thou set thy nest among the stars;" and the tower of Babel was to "reach unto heaven" Genesis 11:4; and the antichrist, whose symbol the King of Babylon is, Isaiah 14:13 says, "I will exalt my throne above the stars of God." Babylon lying in a large plain, on the sides of the Euphrates, the image of its eagle's-nest on high must be taken, not from any natural eminence, but wholly from the works of man.

    Its walls, and its hanging gardens were among "the seven wonders of the world." Eye-witnesses speak of its walls, encompassing at least 100 square miles , "and as large as the land-graviat of Hesse Homberg;" those walls, 335, or 330 feet high, and 85 feet broad ; a fortified palace, nearly 7 miles in circumference; gardens, 400 Greek feet square, supporting at an artificial height arch upon arch, of "at least 75 feet," forest trees; a temple to its god, said to have been at least 600 feet high.

    If we, creatures of a day, had no one above us, Nebuchadnezzars boast had been true Daniel 4:30, "Is not this great Babylon that I have built for the house of the Kingdom by the might of my power and for the honor of my majesty?" He had built an eagle's nest, which no human arm could reach, encircled by walls which laughed its invaders to scorn, which, at that time, no skill could scale or shatter or mine. Even as one sees in a picture the vast mounds which still remain , one can hardly imagine that they were, brick upon brick, wholly the work of man.

    To be delivered from the hand (grasp) of evil - that it should not be able to reach him. Evil is spoken of as a living power , which would seize him, whose grasp he would defy. It was indeed a living power, since it was the will of Almighty God, whose servant and instrument Cyrus was, to chasten Babylon, when its sins were full. Such was the counsel, what the result? The evil covetousness which he worked, brought upon him the evil, from which, in that nest built by the hard toil of his captives, he thought to deliver himself.

    Wesley's Notes on Habakkuk 2:9

    2:9 To his house - His family which he would enrich, and raise high. Delivered - Kept secure and out of danger from all below him.