Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Hebrews 10:24

    Hebrews 10:24 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And let us consider one another to provoke unto love and to good works:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And let us consider one another to provoke to love and to good works:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and let us consider one another to provoke unto love and good works;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And let us be moving one another at all times to love and good works;

    Webster's Revision

    and let us consider one another to provoke unto love and good works;

    World English Bible

    Let us consider how to provoke one another to love and good works,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and let us consider one another to provoke unto love and good works;

    Definitions for Hebrews 10:24

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Hebrews 10:24

    And let us consider one another - Κατανοωμεν· Let us diligently and attentively consider each other's trials, difficulties, and weaknesses; feel for each other, and excite each other to an increase of love to God and man; and, as the proof of it, to be fruitful in good works. The words εις παροξυσμον, to the provocation, are often taken in a good sense, and signify excitement, stirring up, to do any thing laudable, useful, honorable, or necessary. Xenophon, Cyrop., lib. vi., page 108, speaking of the conduct of Cyrus towards his officers, says: Και τουτους επαινων τε, παρωξυνε, και χαριζομενος αυτοις ὁ τι δυναιτο. "He by praises and gifts excited them as much as possible." See the note on Acts 15:39, where the subject is farther considered.

    Barnes' Notes on Hebrews 10:24

    And let us consider one another - Let us so regard the welfare of others as to endeavor to excite them to persevere in the Christian life. The idea is, that much might be done, in securing perseverance and fidelity, by mutual kind exhortation. They were not to be selfish; they were not to regard their own interests only (notes, Philippians 2:4); they were to have a kind sympathy in the concerns of each other. They had, as Christians have now, the same duties to perform, and the same trials to meet, and they should strengthen each other in their trials and encourage them in their work.

    To provoke unto love - We use the word "provoke" now in a somewhat different sense, as meaning to offend, to irritate, to incense; but its original meaning is to "arouse, to excite, to call into action," and it is used in this sense here. The Greek is, literally, "unto a paroxysm of love" - εἰς παροξυσμον eis paroxusmon - the word "paroxysm" meaning "excitement or impulse," and the idea is, that they were to endeavor to arouse or excite each other to the manifestation of love. The word is what properly expresses excitement, and means that Christians should endeavor to excite each other. Men are sometimes afraid of excitement in religion. But there is no danger that Christians will ever be excited to love each other too much, or to perform too many good works.