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Hebrews 10:37

    Hebrews 10:37 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For yet a little while, and he that shall come will come, and will not tarry.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For yet a little while, and he that shall come will come, and will not tarry.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For yet a very little while, He that cometh shall come, and shall not tarry.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    In a very little time he who is coming will come; he will not be slow.

    Webster's Revision

    For yet a very little while, He that cometh shall come, and shall not tarry.

    World English Bible

    "In a very little while, he who comes will come, and will not wait.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For yet a very little while, He that cometh shall come, and shall not tarry.

    Clarke's Commentary on Hebrews 10:37

    For yet a little while - Ετι γαρ μικρον ὁσον· For yet a very little time. In a very short space of time the Messiah will come, and execute judgment upon your rebellious country. This is determined, because they have filled up the measure of their iniquity, and their destruction slumbereth not. The apostle seems to refer to Habakkuk 2:3, Habakkuk 2:4, and accommodates the words to his own purpose.

    Barnes' Notes on Hebrews 10:37

    For yet a little while - There seems to be an allusion here to what the Saviour himself said, "A little while, and ye shall not see me; and again, a little while and ye shall see me;" John 16:16. Or more probably it may be to Habakkuk 2:3. "For the vision is yet for an appointed time, but at the end it shall speak, and not he: though it tarry, wait for it; because it will surely come, it will not tarry." The idea which the apostle means to convey evidently is, that the time of their deliverance from their trials was not far remote.

    And he that shall come will come - The reference here is, doubtless, to the Messiah. But what "coming" of his is referred to here, is more uncertain. Most probably the idea is, that the Messiah who was coming to destroy Jerusalem, and to overthrow the Jewish power Matthew 24, would soon do this. In this way he would put a period to their persecutions and trials, as the power of the Jewish people to afflict them would be at an end. A similar idea occurs in Luke 21:28. "And when these things begin to come to pass, then look up, and lift up your heads; for your redemption draweth nigh;" see the notes on that passage. The Christians in Palestine were oppressed, reviled, and persecuted by the Jews. The destruction of the city and the temple would put an end to that power, and would be in fact the time of deliverance for those who had been persecuted. In the passage before us, Paul intimates that that period was not far distant. Perhaps there were already "signs" of his coming, or indications that he was about to appear, and he therefore urges them patiently to persevere in their fidelity to him during the little time of trial that remained. The same encouragement and consolation may be employed still. To all the afflicted it may be said that "he that shall come will come" soon. The time of affiction is not long. Soon the Redeemer will appear to deliver his afflicted people from all their sorrow; to remove them from a world of pain and tears; and to raise their bodies from the dust, and to receive them to mansions where trials are forever unknown; John 14:3 note; 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 notes.

    Wesley's Notes on Hebrews 10:37

    10:37 He that cometh - To reward every man according to his works.