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Hebrews 12:12

    Hebrews 12:12 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Wherefore lift up the hands which hang down, and the feeble knees;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Why lift up the hands which hang down, and the feeble knees;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Wherefore lift up the hands that hang down, and the palsied knees;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For this cause let the hands which are hanging down be lifted up, and let the feeble knees be made strong,

    Webster's Revision

    Wherefore lift up the hands that hang down, and the palsied knees;

    World English Bible

    Therefore, lift up the hands that hang down and the feeble knees,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Wherefore lift up the hands that hang down, and the palsied knees;

    Definitions for Hebrews 12:12

    Wherefore - Why?; for what reason?; for what cause?

    Clarke's Commentary on Hebrews 12:12

    Wherefore lift up the hands - The apostle refers to Isaiah 35:3. The words are an address to persons almost worn out with sickness and fatigue, whose hands hang down, whose knees shake, and who are totally discouraged. These are exhorted to exert themselves, and take courage, with the assurance that they shall infallibly conquer if they persevere.

    Barnes' Notes on Hebrews 12:12

    Wherefore - In view of the facts which have been now stated - that afflictions are sent from God, and are evidences of his paternal watchfulness.

    Lift up the hands which hang down - As if from weariness and exhaustion. Renew your courage; make a new effort to bear them. The hands fall by the side when we are exhausted with toil, or worn down by disease; see the notes on Isaiah 35:3, from which place this exhortation is taken.

    And the feeble knees - The knees also become enfeebled by long effort, and tremble as if their strength were gone. Courage and resolution may do much, however, to make them firm, and it is to this that the apostle exhorts those to whom he wrote. They were to make every effort to bear up under their trials. The hope of victory will do much to strengthen one almost exhausted in battle; the desire to reach home invigorates the frame of the weary traveler. So it is with the Christian. In persecution, and sickness, and bereavement, he may be ready to sink under his burdens. The hands fall, and the knees tremble, and the heart sinks within us. But confidence in God, and the hope of heaven, and the assurance that all this is for our good, will reinvigorate the enfeebled frame, and enable us to bear what we once supposed would crush us to the dust. A courageous mind braces a feeble body, and hope makes it fresh for new conflicts.