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Hebrews 13:2

    Hebrews 13:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Be not forgetful to entertain strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Be not forgetful to entertain strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Forget not to show love unto strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Take care to keep open house: because in this way some have had angels as their guests, without being conscious of it.

    Webster's Revision

    Forget not to show love unto strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares.

    World English Bible

    Don't forget to show hospitality to strangers, for in doing so, some have entertained angels without knowing it.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Forget not to shew love unto strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares.

    Clarke's Commentary on Hebrews 13:2

    To entertain stranger's - In those early times, when there were scarcely any public inns or houses of entertainment, it was an office of charity and mercy to receive, lodge, and entertain travelers; and this is what the apostle particularly recommends.

    Entertained angels - Abraham and Lot are the persons particularly referred to. Their history, the angels whom they entertained, not knowing them to be such, and the good they derived from exercising their hospitality on these occasions, are well known; and have been particularly referred to in the notes on Genesis 18:3 (note); Genesis 19:2 (note).

    Barnes' Notes on Hebrews 13:2

    Be not forgetful to entertain strangers - On the duty of hospitality, see a full explanation in the notes on Romans 12:13.

    For thereby some have entertained angels unawares - Without knowing that they were angels. As Abraham (Genesis 18:2 ff), and Lot did; Genesis 19. The motive here urged for doing it is, that by entertaining the stranger we may perhaps be honored with the presence of those whose society will be to us an honor and a blessing. It is not well for us to miss the opportunity of the presence, the conversation, and the prayers of the good. The influence of such guests in a family is worth more than it costs to entertain them. If there is danger that we may sometimes receive those of an opposite character. yet it is not wise on account of such possible danger, to lose the opportunity of entertaining those whose presence would be a blessing. Many a parent owes the conversion of a child to the influence of a pious stranger in his family; and the hope that this may occur, or that our own souls may be blessed, should make us ready, at all proper times, to welcome the feet of the stranger to our doors. Many a man, if, he had been accosted as Abraham was at the door of his tent by strangers, would have turned them rudely away; many a one in the situation of Lot would have sent the unknown guests rudely from his door; but who can estimate what would have been the results of such a course on the destiny of those good people and their families? For a great number of instances in which the pagan were supposed to have entertained the gods, though unknown to them, see Wetstein in loc.

    Wesley's Notes on Hebrews 13:2

    13:2 Some - Abraham and Lot. Have entertained angels unawares - So may an unknown guest, even now, be of more worth than he appears, and may have angels attending him, though unseen. Gen 18:2; Gen 19:1.