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Hebrews 3:11

    Hebrews 3:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    So I sware in my wrath, They shall not enter into my rest.)

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    So I swore in my wrath, They shall not enter into my rest.)

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    As I sware in my wrath, They shall not enter into my rest.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And being angry I made an oath, saying, They may not come into my rest.

    Webster's Revision

    As I sware in my wrath, They shall not enter into my rest.

    World English Bible

    as I swore in my wrath, 'They will not enter into my rest.'"

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    As I sware in my wrath, They shall not enter into my rest.

    Clarke's Commentary on Hebrews 3:11

    So I sware in my wrath - God's grief at their continued disobedience became wrath at their final impenitence, and therefore he excluded them from the promised rest.

    Barnes' Notes on Hebrews 3:11

    So I sware in my wrath - God is often represented in the Scriptures as "swearing" - and usually as swearing by himself, or by his own existence. Of course this in figurative, and denotes a strong affirmation, or a settled and determined purpose. An oath with us implies the strongest affirmation, or the expression of the most settled and determined purpose of mind. The meaning here is, that so refractory and perverse had they showed themselves, that he solemnly resolved that they should never enter into the land of Canaan.

    They shall not enter into my rest - Margin, As in the original, "if they shall enter." That is, they shall not enter. The word (אם ‛im) "if" has this negative meaning in Hebrew, and this meaning is transferred to the Greek word "if;" compare 1 Samuel 3:17; 2 Samuel 3:35; 2 Kings 6:31. It is called "my rest" here, meaning that it was such rest as God had provided, or such as he enjoyed. The particular "rest" referred to here was that of the land of Canaan, but which was undoubtedly regarded as emblematic of the "rest" in heaven. Into that rest God solemnly said they should never enter. They had been rebellious. All the means of reclaiming them had failed. God had warned and entreated them; he had caused his mercies to pass before them, and had visited them with judgments in vain; and he now declares that for all their rebellion they should be excluded from the promised land. God speaks here in the manner of human beings. Men are affected with feelings of indignation in such circumstances, and God makes use of such language as expresses such feelings. But we are to understand it in a manner consistent with his character, and we are not to suppose that he is affected with the same emotions which agitate the bosoms of people. The meaning is, that he formed and expressed a deliberate and solemn purpose that they should never enter into the promised land. Whether this "rest" refers here to heaven, and whether the meaning is that God would exclude them from that blessed world, will be more appropriately considered in the next chapter. The particular idea is, that they were to be excluded from the promised land, and that they should fall in the wilderness. No one can doubt, also, that their conduct had been such as to show that the great body of them were unfit to enter into heaven.