Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Hosea 9:16

    Hosea 9:16 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Ephraim is smitten, their root is dried up, they shall bear no fruit: yea, though they bring forth, yet will I slay even the beloved fruit of their womb.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Ephraim is smitten, their root is dried up, they shall bear no fruit: yes, though they bring forth, yet will I slay even the beloved fruit of their womb.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Ephraim is smitten, their root is dried up, they shall bear no fruit: yea, though they bring forth, yet will I slay the beloved fruit of their womb.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The rod has come on Ephraim, their root is dry, let them have no fruit; even though they give birth, I will put to death the dearest fruit of their bodies.

    Webster's Revision

    Ephraim is smitten, their root is dried up, they shall bear no fruit: yea, though they bring forth, yet will I slay the beloved fruit of their womb.

    World English Bible

    Ephraim is struck. Their root has dried up. They will bear no fruit. Even though they bring forth, yet I will kill the beloved ones of their womb."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Ephraim is smitten, their root is dried up, they shall bear no fruit: yea, though they bring forth, yet will I slay the beloved fruit of their womb.

    Definitions for Hosea 9:16

    Yea - Yes; certainly.

    Clarke's Commentary on Hosea 9:16

    Ephraim is smitten - The thing being determined, it is considered as already done.

    Their root is dried up - They shall never more be a kingdom. And they never had any political form from their captivity by the Assyrians to the present day.

    Yea, though they bring forth - See the note on Hosea 9:11-12 (note).

    Barnes' Notes on Hosea 9:16

    Ephraim is smitten - The prophet, under the image of a tree, repeats the same sentence of God upon Israel. The word "smitten" is used of the smiting of the tree from above, especially by the visitation of God, as by "blasting" and "mildew" Amos 4:9. Yet such smiting, although it falls heavily for the time, leaves hope for the future. He adds then, "their root is" also "withered," so that "they should bear no fruit;" or if, perchance, while the root was still drying up and not quite dead, any fruit he yet found, "yet will I slay," God says, "the beloved," fruit "of their womb," the desired fruit of their bodies, that which their souls longed for. : "So long as they have children, and multiply the fruit of the womb, they think that they bear fruit, they deem not that "their root is dried," or that they have been severed by the axe of excision, and "rooted out of the land of the living;" but, in the anguish at the "slaying" of those they most loved, they shall say, better had it been to have had no children."