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Isaiah 11:6

    Isaiah 11:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatted calf together; and a little child shall lead them.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And the wolf shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the wolf will be living with the lamb, and the leopard will take his rest with the young goat; and the lion will take grass for food like the ox; and the young lion will go with the young ones of the herd; and a little child will be their guide.

    Webster's Revision

    And the wolf shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them.

    World English Bible

    The wolf will live with the lamb, and the leopard will lie down with the young goat; The calf, the young lion, and the fattened calf together; and a little child will lead them.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the wolf shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them.

    Definitions for Isaiah 11:6

    Fatling - Fat cattle.

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 11:6

    The wolf also shall, etc. "Then shall the wolf," etc. - The idea of the renewal of the golden age, as it is called, is much the same in the Oriental writers with that of the Greeks and Romans: - the wild beasts grow tame; serpents and poisonous herbs become harmless; all is peace and harmony, plenty and happiness: -

    Occidet et serpens, et fallax herba veneni Occidet.

    Vega. Eclog. 4:24.

    "The serpent's brood shall die. The sacred ground

    Shall weeds and noxious plants refuse to bear."

    - Nec magnos metuent armenta leones.

    Virg. Eclog. 4:22.

    "Nor shall the flocks fear the great lions."

    Non lupus insidias explorat ovilia circum,

    Nec gregibus nocturnus obambulat: acrior illum

    Cura domat: timidae damae cervique fugaces

    Nunc interque canes, et circum tecta vagantur.

    Virg. Georg. 3:537.

    "The nightly wolf that round the enclosure prowled,

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    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 11:6

    The wolf also - In this, and the following verses, the prophet describes the effect of his reign in producing peace and tranquility on the earth. The description is highly poetical, and is one that is common in ancient writings in describing a golden age. The two leading ideas are those of "peace" and "security." The figure is taken from the condition of animals of all descriptions living in a state of harmony, where those which are by nature defenseless, and which are usually made the prey of the strong, are suffered to live in security. By nature the wolf preys upon the lamb, and the leopard upon the kid, and the adder is venomous, and the bear, and the cow, and the lion, and the ox, cannot live together. But if a state of things should arise, where all this hostility would cease; where the wild animals would lay aside their ferocity, and where the feeble and the gentle would be safe; where the adder would cease to be venomous, and where all would be so mild and harmless that a little child would be safe, and could lead even the most ferocious animals, that state would represent the reign of the Messiah. Under his dominion, such a change would be produced as that those who were by nature violent, severe, and oppressive; those whose disposition is illustrated by the ferocious and bloodthirsty propensities of the lion and the leopard, and by the poison of the adder, would be changed and subdued, and would be disposed to live in peace and harmony with others. This is the "general" idea of the passage. We are not to cut the interpretation to the quick, and to press the expressions to know what particular class of people are represented by the lion, the bear, or the adder. The "general" image that is before the prophet's mind is that of peace and safety, "such as that would be" if a change were to be produced in wild animals, making them tame, and peaceful, and harmless.

    This description of a golden age is one that is common in Oriental writers, where the wild beasts are represented as growing tame; where serpents are harmless; and where all is plenty, peace, and happiness. Thus Jones, in his commentary on Asiatic poetry, quotes from an Arabic poet, "Ibn Onein," p. 380:

    Justitia, a qua mansuetus fit lupus fame astrictus,

    Esuriens, licet hinnulum candidurn videat -

    'Justice, by which the ravening wolf, driven by hunger, becomes tame, although he sees a white kid.' Thus, also, Ferdusi, a Persian poet:

    Rerum Dominus, Mahmud, rex. potens,

    Ad cujus aquam potum veniunt simul agnus et lupus -

    'Mahmud, mighty king, lord of events, to whose fountain the lamb and the wolf come to drink.' Thus Virgil, Eclogue iv. 21:

    Ipsae lactae domum referent distenta capellae

    Ubera; nec magnos metuent armenta leones -

    Home their full udders, goats, unurged shall bear,

    Nor shall the herd the lordly lion fear.

    And immediately after:

    Occidet et serpens, et fallax herba veneni

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