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Isaiah 12:1

    Isaiah 12:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And in that day thou shalt say, O LORD, I will praise thee: though thou wast angry with me, thine anger is turned away, and thou comfortedst me.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And in that day you shall say, O LORD, I will praise you: though you were angry with me, your anger is turned away, and you comforted me.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And in that day thou shalt say, I will give thanks unto thee, O Jehovah; for though thou wast angry with me, thine anger is turned away and thou comfortest me.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And in that day you will say I will give praise to you, O Lord; for though you were angry with me, your wrath is turned away, and I am comforted.

    Webster's Revision

    And in that day thou shalt say, I will give thanks unto thee, O Jehovah; for though thou wast angry with me, thine anger is turned away and thou comfortest me.

    World English Bible

    In that day you will say, "I will give thanks to you, Yahweh; for though you were angry with me, your anger has turned away and you comfort me.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And in that day thou shalt say, I will give thanks unto thee, O LORD; for though thou wast angry with me, thine anger is turned away, and thou comfortest me.

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 12:1

    Though thou wast angry "For though thou hast been angry" - The Hebrew phrase, to which the Septuagint and Vulgate have too closely adhered, is exactly the same with that of St. Paul, Romans 6:17 : "But thanks be to God, that ye were the slaves of sin; but have obeyed from the heart;" that is, "that whereas, or though, ye were the slaves of sin, yet ye have now obeyed from the heart the doctrine on the model of which ye were formed."

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 12:1

    And in that day - The day referred to in the previous chapter, the time of the Messiah, when the effects of his reign shall be seen everywhere. The duty of praise, however, is couched in such language as to make it applicable to the event predicted in the former part of the prophecy Isaiah 10 - the delivering of the nation from the invasion of Sennacherib, as well as the more glorious event on which the prophet fixed his eye Isaiah 11 - the coming and reign of the Messiah. The language of this song of praise would be appropriate to both these events.

    Thou shalt say - The address to an individual here, in the term 'thou,' is equivalent to "everyone," meaning that "all" who were thus interested in the divine interposition should say it.

    O Lord - O Yahweh - the great author of this interposition.

    I will praise thee: though thou wast angry with me - If this language is applied to the Jews, and supposed to be used by them in regard to the invasion of Sennacherib, it means, that God suffered their land to be invaded, and to be subjected to calamities, in consequence of their sins (Isaiah 10:6 ff.) If it is supposed to be applied to the time of the Messiah, then it is language which every redeemed sinner may use, that God was angry with him, but that his anger is turned away. As applicable to the redeemed, it is an acknowledgement which they all feel, that they have no claim to his mercy, and that it lays the foundation for unceasing praise that his anger is turned away by the plan of salvation.

    Wesley's Notes on Isaiah 12:1

    12:1 In that day - When this great work of the reduction of Israel, and conversion of the Gentiles is fulfilled.