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Isaiah 14:11

    Isaiah 14:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Thy pomp is brought down to the grave, and the noise of thy viols: the worm is spread under thee, and the worms cover thee.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Your pomp is brought down to the grave, and the noise of your viols: the worm is spread under you, and the worms cover you.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Thy pomp is brought down to Sheol, and the noise of thy viols: the worm is spread under thee, and worms cover thee.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Your pride has gone down into the underworld, and the noise of your instruments of music; the worms are under you, and your body is covered with them.

    Webster's Revision

    Thy pomp is brought down to Sheol, and the noise of thy viols: the worm is spread under thee, and worms cover thee.

    World English Bible

    Your pomp is brought down to Sheol, with the sound of your stringed instruments. Maggots are spread out under you, and worms cover you.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Thy pomp is brought down to hell, and the noise of thy viols: the worm is spread under thee, and worms cover thee.

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 14:11

    Cover thee "Thy covering" - Twenty-eight MSS. (ten ancient) of Kennicott's, thirty-nine of De Rossi's, twelve editions, with the Septuagint and Vulgate, read ומכסך umechassecha, in the singular number.

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 14:11

    Thy pomp - Thy magnificence (see the note at Isaiah 5:14).

    The noise of thy viols - Instruments of music were often used in their feasts; and the meaning here is, that instead of being surrounded with splendor, and the instruments of music, the monarch was now brought down to the corruption and stillness of the grave. The instrument referred to by the word 'viol' (נבל nēbel, plur. נבלים nebalı̂ym, Greek νάβλα nabla, Latin nablium), was a stringed instrument usually with twelve strings, and played by the pecten or by the hand (see the notes and illustrations on Isaiah 5:12). Additional force is given by all these expressions if they are read, as Lowth reads them, as questions asked in suprise, and in a taunting manner, over the haughty king of Babylon - 'Is thy pride then brought down to the grave?' etc.

    The worm - This word, in Hebrew (רמה rimmâh), denotes a worm that is found in putrid substances Exodus 16:25; Job 7:5; Job 21:26.

    Is spread under thee - Is become thy couch - instead of the gorgeous couch on which thou wert accustomed to repose.

    And the worm - (תולעה tôlê‛âh) - the same word which occurs in Isaiah 1:18, and rendered there as "crimson" (see the note on that verse). This word is usually applied to the insect from which the crimson dye was obtained; but it is also applied to the worm which preys upon the dead Exodus 16:20; Isaiah 66:24.

    Cover thee - Instead of the splendid covering which was over thee when reposing on thy couch in thy palace. What could be more humiliating than this language? How striking the contrast between his present situation and that in which he reposed in Babylon! And yet this language is as applicable to all others as to that prond and haughty king. It is equally true of the great and mighty everywhere; of the rich, the frivolous, the beautiful, and the proud who lie on beds of down, that they will soon lie where worms shall be their couch and their covering. How ought this reflection to humble our pride! How should it lead us to be prepared for that hour when the grave shall be our bed; and when far away from the sound of the viol and the harp; from the sweet voice of friendship and the noise of revelry, we shall mingle with our native dust!