Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Isaiah 29:2

    Isaiah 29:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Yet I will distress Ariel, and there shall be heaviness and sorrow: and it shall be unto me as Ariel.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Yet I will distress Ariel, and there shall be heaviness and sorrow: and it shall be to me as Ariel.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    then will I distress Ariel, and there shall be mourning and lamentation; and she shall be unto me as Ariel.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And I will send trouble on Ariel, and there will be weeping and cries of grief; and she will be to me as Ariel.

    Webster's Revision

    then will I distress Ariel, and there shall be mourning and lamentation; and she shall be unto me as Ariel.

    World English Bible

    then I will distress Ariel, and there will be mourning and lamentation. She shall be to me as an altar hearth.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    then will I distress Ariel, and there shall be mourning and lamentation: and she shall be unto me as Ariel.

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 29:2

    There shall be heaviness and sorrow "There shall be continual mourning and sorrow" - Instead of your present joy and festivity.

    And it shall be unto me as Ariel "And it shall be unto me as the hearth of the great altar" - That is, it shall be the seat of the fire of God; which shall issue from thence to consume his enemies. See note on Isaiah 29:1 (note). Or, perhaps, all on flame; as it was when taken by the Chaldeans; or covered with carcasses and blood, as when taken by the Romans: an intimation of which more distant events, though not immediate subjects of the prophecy, may perhaps be given in this obscure passage.

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 29:2

    Yet I will distress Ariel - The reference here is doubtless to the siege which God says Isaiah 29:3 he would bring upon the guilty and formal city.

    And there shall be heaviness and sorrow - This was true of the city in the siege of Sennacherib, to which this probably refers. Though the city was delivered in a sudden and remarkable manner (see the note at Isaiah 29:7-8), yet it was also true that it was reduced to great distress (see Isaiah 36; 37)

    And it shall be unto me as Ariel - This phrase shows that in Isaiah 29:1 Jerusalem is called 'Ariel,' because it contained the great altar, and was the place of sacrifice. The word "Ariel" here is to be understood in the sense "of the hearth of the great altar;" and the meaning is, 'I will indeed make Jerusalem like the great altar; I will make it the burning place of wrath where my enemies shall be consumed as if they were on the altar of burnt sacrifice.' Thus in Isaiah 30:9, it is said of Yahweh that his 'fire is in Zion, and his furnace in Jerusalem.' This is a strong expression, denoting the calamity that was approaching; and though the main reference in this whole passage is to the distress that would come upon them in the invasion of Sennacherib, yet there is no impropriety in supposing that there was presented to the mind of the prophet in vision the image of the total ruin that would come yet upon the city by the Chaldeans - when the temple, the palaces, and the dwellings of the magnificent city of David would be in flames, and like a vast blazing altar consuming that which was laid upon it.