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Isaiah 38:6

    Isaiah 38:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And I will deliver thee and this city out of the hand of the king of Assyria: and I will defend this city.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And I will deliver you and this city out of the hand of the king of Assyria: and I will defend this city.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And I will deliver thee and this city out of the hand of the king of Assyria; and I will defend this city.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And I will keep you and this town safe from the hands of the king of Assyria: and I will keep watch over this town.

    Webster's Revision

    And I will deliver thee and this city out of the hand of the king of Assyria; and I will defend this city.

    World English Bible

    I will deliver you and this city out of the hand of the king of Assyria, and I will defend this city.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And I will deliver thee and this city out of the hand of the king of Assyria: and I will defend this city.

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 38:6

    I will defend this city - The other copy, 2 Kings 20:6, adds:" for mine own sake, and for the sake of David my servant;" and the sentence seems somewhat abrupt without it.

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 38:6

    And I will deliver thee and this city - The purport of this promise is, that he and the city should be finally and entirely delivered from all danger of invasion from the Assyrians. It might be apprehended that Sennacherib would collect a large army, and return; or that his successor would prosecute the war which he had commenced. But the assurance here is given to Hezekiah that he had nothing more to fear from the Assyrians (see the notes at Isaiah 31:4-5; Isaiah 37:35). In the parallel place in 2 Kings 20:6, it is added. 'I will defend this city for mine own sake, and for my servant David's sake.' In the parallel passage also, in 2 Kings 20:7-8, there is inserted the statement which occurs in Isaiah at the end of the chapter Isaiah 38:21-22. It is evident that those two verses more appropriately come in here. Lowth conjectures that the abridger of the history omitted those verses, and when he had transcribed the song of Hezekiah, he saw that they were necessary to complete the narrative, and placed them at the end of the chapter, with proper marks to have them inserted in the right place, which marks were overlooked by transcribers. It is, however, immaterial where the statement is made; and it is now impossible to tell in what manner the transposition occurred.