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Isaiah 38:9

    Isaiah 38:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The writing of Hezekiah king of Judah, when he had been sick, and was recovered of his sickness:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The writing of Hezekiah king of Judah, when he had been sick, and was recovered of his sickness:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The writing of Hezekiah king of Judah, when he had been sick, and was recovered of his sickness.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The writing of Hezekiah, king of Judah, after he had been ill, and had got better from his disease.

    Webster's Revision

    The writing of Hezekiah king of Judah, when he had been sick, and was recovered of his sickness.

    World English Bible

    The writing of Hezekiah king of Judah, when he had been sick, and had recovered of his sickness.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The writing of Hezekiah king of Judah, when he had been sick, and was recovered of his sickness.

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 38:9

    The writing of Hezekiah - Here the book of Kings deserts us, the song of Hezekiah not being inserted in it. Another copy of this very obscure passage (obscure not only from the concise poetical style, but because it is probably very incorrect) would have been of great service.

    The MSS. and ancient Versions, especially the latter, will help us to get through some of the many difficulties which we meet with in it.

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 38:9

    The writing of Hezekiah - This is the title to the following hymn - a record which Hezekiah made to celebrate the goodness of God in restoring him to health. The writing itself is poetry, as is indicated by the parallelism, and by the general structure. It is in many respects quite obscure - an obscurity perhaps arising from the brevity and conciseness which are apparent in the whole piece. It is remarkable that this song or hymn is not found in the parallel passage in the Book of Kings. The reason why it was omitted there, and inserted here, is unknown. It is possible that it was drawn up for Hezekiah by Isaiah, and that it is inserted here as a part of his composition, though adopted by Hezekiah, and declared to be his, that is, as expressing the gratitude of his heart on his recovery from his disease. It was common to compose an ode or hymn of praise on occasion of deliverance from calamity, or any remarkable interposition of God (see the notes at Isaiah 12:1; Isaiah 25:1; Isaiah 26:1). Many of the Psalms of David were composed on such occasions, and were expressive of gratitude to God for deliverance from impending calamity. The hymn or song is composed of two parts. In the first part Isaiah 38:10-14, Hezekiah describes his feelings and his fears when he was suffering, and especially the apprehension of his mind at the prospect of death; and the second part Isaiah 38:15-20 expresses praise to God for his goodness.