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Isaiah 43:22

    Isaiah 43:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But thou hast not called upon me, O Jacob; but thou hast been weary of me, O Israel.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But you have not called on me, O Jacob; but you have been weary of me, O Israel.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Yet thou hast not called upon me, O Jacob; but thou hast been weary of me, O Israel.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But you have made no prayer to me, O Jacob: and you have given no thought to me, O Israel.

    Webster's Revision

    Yet thou hast not called upon me, O Jacob; but thou hast been weary of me, O Israel.

    World English Bible

    Yet you have not called on me, Jacob; but you have been weary of me, Israel.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Yet thou hast not called upon me, O Jacob; but thou hast been weary of me, O Israel.

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 43:22

    But thou hast not called upon me - The connection is: But thou, Israel, whom I have chosen, whom I have formed for myself to be my witness against the false gods of the nations; even thou hast revolted from me, hast neglected my worship, and hast been perpetually running after strange gods. The emphasis of this and the following parts of the sentence, on which the sense depends, is laid on the words Me, on My Account, etc. The Jews were diligent in performing the external services of religion; in offering prayers, incense, sacrifices, oblations; but their prayers were not offered with faith; and their oblations were made more frequently to their idols than to the God of their fathers. The Hebrew idiom excludes with a general negative, in a comparative sense, one of two objects opposed to one another: thus, "I will have mercy, and not sacrifice," Hosea 6:6. "For I spoke not to your fathers, nor commanded them, concerning burnt-offerings or sacrifices; but this thing I commanded them, saying, Obey my voice," Jeremiah 7:22, Jeremiah 7:23. And the meaning of this place of Isaiah seems to be much the same with that of Amos; who however has explained at large both parts of the comparison, and specified the false service opposed to the true: -

    "Have ye offered unto me sacrifices and offerings,

    In the wilderness forty years, O house of Israel?

    Nay, but you have borne the tabernacle of your Moloch,

    And Chiun, your images;

    The star of your god, which you made to yourselves."

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 43:22

    But thou hast not called upon me - The design of this and the following verses, is to show them that they were indebted to the divine mercy alone for their deliverance from bondage. It was not because they had been either meritorious or faithful; it was not because they had deserved these favors at his hand, for they had been a people that had been distinguished for neglecting their God. On that account, these calamities had come upon them, and their deliverance, therefore, was to be an act of mere unmerited favor.

    Thou hast been weary - As a people, you have been weary of my service. They had accounted his laws grievous and oppressive; and they had groaned under what they regarded as burdensome rites and ceremonies (see Amos 8:5-6; Malachi 1:13). God here refers, doubtless, to the times before the captivity, and is stating what was the general characteristic of the people.

    Wesley's Notes on Isaiah 43:22

    43:22 For - God called to the Gentiles to be his people, because the Jews forsook him. Weary - Thou hast not esteemed my service to be a privilege, but a burden and bondage.