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Isaiah 49:14

    Isaiah 49:14 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But Zion said, The LORD hath forsaken me, and my Lord hath forgotten me.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But Zion said, The LORD has forsaken me, and my Lord has forgotten me.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But Zion said, Jehovah hath forsaken me, and the Lord hath forgotten me.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But Zion said, The Lord has given me up, I have gone from his memory.

    Webster's Revision

    But Zion said, Jehovah hath forsaken me, and the Lord hath forgotten me.

    World English Bible

    But Zion said, "Yahweh has forsaken me, and the Lord has forgotten me."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But Zion said, Jehovah hath forsaken me, and the Lord hath forgotten me.

    Definitions for Isaiah 49:14

    Forsaken - To leave in an abandoned condition.

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 49:14

    The Lord (יהוה Yehovah) hath forsaken me, and my Lord (אדני Adonai) hath forgotten me - But a multitude of MSS. and several ancient editions read יהוה Yehovah in both places.

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 49:14

    But Zion said - On the word 'Zion,' see the note at Isaiah 1:8. The language here is that of complaint, and expresses the deep feeling of the people of God amidst many calamities, afflictions, and trials. It may be applicable to the exile Jews in Babylon during their long captivity, as if God had forsaken them; or to those who were waiting for the coming of the Messiah, and who were sighing for the divine interposition under him to restore the beauty of Zion, and to extend his kingdom; or in general, to the church when wickedness triumphs in a community, and when God seems to have forsaken Zion, and to have forgotten its interests. The language here was suggested, doubtless, by a view of the desolations of Jerusalem and Judea, and of the long and painful captivity in Babylon; but it is general, and is applicable to the people of God, in all times of similar oppression and distress. The object of the prophet is to furnish the assurance that, whatever might be the trials and the sufferings of his people, God had not forgotten them, and he neither could nor would forsake them. For this purpose, he makes use of two most striking and forcible arguments Isaiah 49:15-16, to show in the strongest possible manner that the interests of his people were safe.