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Isaiah 5:3

    Isaiah 5:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And now, O inhabitants of Jerusalem, and men of Judah, judge, I pray you, betwixt me and my vineyard.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And now, O inhabitants of Jerusalem, and men of Judah, judge, I pray you, between me and my vineyard.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And now, O inhabitants of Jerusalem and men of Judah, judge, I pray you, betwixt me and my vineyard.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And now, you people of Jerusalem and you men of Judah, be the judges between me and my vine-garden.

    Webster's Revision

    And now, O inhabitants of Jerusalem and men of Judah, judge, I pray you, betwixt me and my vineyard.

    World English Bible

    "Now, inhabitants of Jerusalem and men of Judah, please judge between me and my vineyard.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And now, O inhabitants of Jerusalem and men of Judah, judge, I pray you, betwixt me and my vineyard.

    Definitions for Isaiah 5:3

    Betwixt - Between; in an intermediate position.

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 5:3

    Inhabitants - ישבי yoshebey, in the plural number; three MSS., (two ancient), and so likewise the Septuagint and Vulgate.

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 5:3

    And now ... - This is an appeal which God makes to the Jews themselves, in regard to the justice and propriety of what he was about to do. A similar appeal he makes in Micah 6:3 : 'O my people, what have I done unto thee? and wherein have I wearied thee? Testify against me.' He intended to "punish" them Isaiah 5:5-6, and he appeals to them for the justice of it. He would do to them as they would do to a vineyard that had been carefully prepared and guarded, and which yet was valueless. A similar appeal he makes in Isaiah 1:18; and our Saviour made an application remarkably similar in his parable of the vineyard, Matthew 21:40-43. It is not improbable that he had his eye on this very place in Isaiah; and it is, therefore, the more remarkable that the Jews did not understand the bearing of his discourse.