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Isaiah 51:21

    Isaiah 51:21 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Therefore hear now this, thou afflicted, and drunken, but not with wine:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Therefore hear now this, you afflicted, and drunken, but not with wine:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Therefore hear now this, thou afflicted, and drunken, but now with wine:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    So now give ear to this, you who are troubled and overcome, but not with wine:

    Webster's Revision

    Therefore hear now this, thou afflicted, and drunken, but now with wine:

    World English Bible

    Therefore hear now this, you afflicted, and drunken, but not with wine:

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Therefore hear now this, thou afflicted, and drunken, but not with wine:

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 51:21

    Drunken, but not with wine - Aeschylus has the same expression: -

    Αοινοις εμμανεις θυμωμασι·

    Eumen. 863.

    Intoxicated with passion, not with wine.

    Schultens thinks that this circumlocution, as he calls it, gradum adfert incomparabiliter majorem; and that it means, not simply without wine, but much more than with wine. Gram. Hebrews p. 182. See his note on Job 30:38.

    The bold image of the cup of God's wrath, often employed by the sacred writers, (see note on Isaiah 1:22), is nowhere handled with greater force and sublimity than in this passage of Isaiah, Isaiah 51:17-23. Jerusalem is represented in person as staggering under the effects of it, destitute of that assistance which she might expect from her children; not one of them being able to support or to lead her. They, abject and amazed, lie at the head of every street, overwhelmed with the greatness of their distress; like the oryx entangled in a net, in vain struggling to rend it, and extricate himself. This is poetry of the first order, sublimity of the highest character.

    Plato had an idea something like this: "Suppose," says he, "God had given to men a medicating potion inducing fear, so that the more any one should drink of it, so much the more miserable he should find himself at every draught, and become fearful of every thing both present and future; and at last, though the most courageous of men, should be totally possessed by fear: and afterwards, having slept off the effects of it, should become himself again." De Leg. i., near the end. He pursues at large this hypothesis, applying it to his own purpose, which has no relation to the present subject. Homer places two vessels at the disposal of Jupiter, one of good, the other of evil. He gives to some a potion mixed of both; to others from the evil vessel only: these are completely miserable. Iliad 24:527-533.

    Δοιοι γαρ τε πιθοι κατακειαται εν Διος ουδει

    Δωρων, οἱα διδωσι, κακων, ἑτερος δε εαων,

    Ὡ μεν καμμιξας δῳη Ζευς τερπικεραυνος,

    Αλλοτε μεν τε κακῳ ὁγε κυρεται, αλλοτε δ' εσθλῳ·

    Ὡ δε κε των λυγρων δῳη, λωβητον εθηκε.

    Και ἑ κακη βουβρωστις επι χθονα διαν ελαυνει·

    Φοιτᾳ δ' ουτε θεοισι τετιμενος, ουτι βροτοισιν.

    continued...

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 51:21

    And drunken, but not with wine - Overcome and prostrate, but not under the influence of intoxicating drink. They were prostrate by the wrath of God.