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Isaiah 56:9

    Isaiah 56:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    All ye beasts of the field, come to devour, yea, all ye beasts in the forest.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    All you beasts of the field, come to devour, yes, all you beasts in the forest.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    All ye beasts of the field, come to devour, yea , all ye beasts in the forest.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    All you beasts of the field, come together for your meat, even all you beasts of the wood.

    Webster's Revision

    All ye beasts of the field, come to devour, yea , all ye beasts in the forest.

    World English Bible

    All you animals of the field, come to devour, [yes], all you animals in the forest.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    All ye beasts of the field, come to devour, yea, all ye beasts in the forest.

    Definitions for Isaiah 56:9

    Yea - Yes; certainly.

    Clarke's Commentary on Isaiah 56:9

    All ye beasts of the field - Here manifestly begins a new section. The prophet in the foregoing chapters, having comforted the faithful Jews with many great promises of God's favor to be extended to them, in the restoration of their ruined state, and in the enlargement of his Church by the admission of the Gentiles; here on a sudden makes a transition to the more disagreeable part of the prospect, and to a sharp reproof of the wicked and unbelievers; and especially of the negligent and faithless governors and teachers, of the idolaters and hypocrites, who would still draw down his judgments upon the nation. Probably having in view the destruction of their city and polity by the Chaldeans, and perhaps by the Romans. The same subject is continued in the next chapter; in which the charge of corruption and apostasy becomes more general against the whole Jewish Church. Some expositors have made great difficulties in the 9th verse of this chapter, where there seems to be none. It is perfectly well explained by Jeremiah, Jeremiah 12:7, Jeremiah 12:9, where, having introduced God declaring his purpose of punishing his people, by giving them up as a prey to their enemies the Chaldeans, a charge to these his agents is given in words very nearly the same with those of Isaiah in this place: -

    "I have forsaken my house; I have deserted my heritage;

    I have given up the beloved of my soul into the hands of her enemies. -

    Come away, be gathered together, all ye beasts of the field;

    Come away to devour."

    All ye beasts in the forest "All ye beasts of the forest" - Instead of ביער baiyaar, three MSS. have יער yaar, without the preposition; which seems to be right, and is confirmed by all the ancient Versions.

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 56:9

    All ye beasts of the field - This evidently commences a new subject, and refers to some invasion of the land of Judea. In the previous chapter, the prophet had comforted the people by the assurance of the coming of the Messiah, and by the fact that they should be enlarged by the accession of the Gentiles. He proceeds here to a more disagreeable part of the subject. The design is, to reprove particularly the sins of the rulers of the people, and to assure them that such conduct would incur the vengeance of heaven. The sins reproved are indolence and inattention to duty Isaiah 56:10-12; a spirit of self-indulgence and of slumber, avarice and selfishness, and luxury and intemperance. The vengeance here referred to, Lowth supposes to be the invasion of the land by the Chaldeans, and perhaps by the Romans. Grotius supposes that it refers to the Egyptians, and to bands of robbers from the Chaldeans, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites. Vitringa strangely enough refers it to the barbarous nations which broke in upon the Christian church to lay it waste and destroy it during the decline of the Roman empire, particularly the Huns, Saracens, Turks, Turcomans, Tartars, etc. But the connection seems to demand that it should be understood of some events, not far distant from the time of the prophet, which would be a proper punishment of the crimes then existing. According to this interpretation, the reference here, I suppose, is to the invasion of the land by the Chaldeans. They would come as wild beasts, to spread terror and devastation before them. And so great were the national crimes, that the prophet calls on them to come and devour all before them. The comparison of invaders to wild beasts is not uncommon in the Scriptures. Thus Jeremiah 12:9 -

    Mine heritage is unto me as a speckled bird,

    The birds round about are against her;

    Come ye, assemble all the beasts of the field,

    Come to devour.

    So Jeremiah 50:17 -

    Israel is a scattered sheep;

    The lions have driven him away;

    First the king of Assyria hath devoured him,

    And last this Nebuchadrezzar, king of Babylon, hath broken his bones.

    See also Isaiah 9:11.