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Isaiah 64:11

    Isaiah 64:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Our holy and our beautiful house, where our fathers praised thee, is burned up with fire: and all our pleasant things are laid waste.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Our holy and our beautiful house, where our fathers praised you, is burned up with fire: and all our pleasant things are laid waste.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Our holy and our beautiful house, where our fathers praised thee, is burned with fire; and all our pleasant places are laid waste.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Our holy and beautiful house, where our fathers gave praise to you, is burned with fire; and all the things of our desire have come to destruction.

    Webster's Revision

    Our holy and our beautiful house, where our fathers praised thee, is burned with fire; and all our pleasant places are laid waste.

    World English Bible

    Our holy and our beautiful house, where our fathers praised you, is burned with fire; and all our pleasant places are laid waste.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Our holy and our beautiful house, where our fathers praised thee, is burned with fire; and all our pleasant things are laid waste.

    Barnes' Notes on Isaiah 64:11

    Our holy and our beautiful house - The temple. It was called 'holy,' because it was dedicated to the service of God; and 'beautiful,' on account of its extraordinary magnificence. The original word more properly means glorious.

    Where our fathers praised thee - Few attachments become stronger than that which is formed for a place of worship where our ancestors have long been engaged in the service of God. It was now a great aggravation of their sufferings, that that beautiful place, consecrated by the fact that their forefathers had long there offered praise to God, was lying in ruins.

    Is burned up with fire - (See 2 Chronicles 36:19).

    And all our pleasant things - All that is precious to us (Hebrew); all the objects of our desire. The reference is to their temples, their homes, their city - to all that was dear to them in their native land. It would be difficult to find a passage anywhere in the Bible - or out of it - that equals this for tenderness and true pathos. They were an exiled people; long suffering in a distant land with the reflection that their homes were in ruins; their splendid temple long since fired and lying in desolation; the rank grass growing in their streets, and their whole country overrun with wild beasts, and with a rank and unsubdued vegetation. To that land they longed to return, and here with the deepest emotion they plead with God in behalf of their desolate country. The sentiment here is, that we should go to God with deep emotion when his church is prostrate, and that then is the time when we should use the most tender pleadings, and when our hearts should be melted within us.