Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

James 2:4

    James 2:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Are ye not then partial in yourselves, and are become judges of evil thoughts?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Are you not then partial in yourselves, and are become judges of evil thoughts?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Do ye not make distinctions among yourselves, and become judges with evil thoughts?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Is there not a division in your minds? have you not become judges with evil thoughts?

    Webster's Revision

    Do ye not make distinctions among yourselves, and become judges with evil thoughts?

    World English Bible

    haven't you shown partiality among yourselves, and become judges with evil thoughts?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    are ye not divided in your own mind, and become judges with evil thoughts?

    Clarke's Commentary on James 2:4

    Are ye not then partial - Ου διεκριθητε· Do ye not make a distinction, though the case has not been heard, and the law has not decided?

    Judges of evil thoughts? - Κριται διαλογισμων πονηρων· Judges of evil reasonings; that is, judges who reason wickedly; who, in effect, say in your hearts, we will espouse the cause of the rich, because they can befriend us; we will neglect that of the poor, because they cannot help us, nor have they power to hurt us.

    Barnes' Notes on James 2:4

    Are ye not then partial in yourselves? - Among yourselves. Do you not show that you are partial?

    And are become judges of evil thoughts - There has been considerable difference of opinion respecting this passage, yet the sense seems not to be difficult. There are two ideas in it: one is, that they showed by this conduct that they took it upon themselves to be judges, to pronounce on the character of men who were strangers, and on their claims to respect (Compare Matthew 7:1); the other is, that in doing this, they were not guided by just rules, but that they did it under the influence of improper "thoughts." They did it not from benevolence; not from a desire to do justice to all according to their moral character; but from that improper feeling which leads us to show honor to men on account of their external appearance, rather than their real worth. The wrong in the case was in their presuming to "judge" these strangers at all, as they practically did by making this distinction, and then by doing it under the influence of such an unjust rule of judgment. The sense is, that we have no right to form a decisive judgment of men on their first appearance, as we do when we treat one with respect and the other not; and that when we make up our opinion in regard to them, it should be by some other means of judging than the question whether they can wear gold rings, and dress well, or not. Beza and Doddridge render this, "ye become judges who reason ill."

    Wesley's Notes on James 2:4

    2:4 Ye distinguish not - To which the most respect is due, to the poor or to the rich. But are become evil - reasoning judges - You reason ill, and so judge wrong: for fine apparel is no proof of worth in him that wears it.