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Jeremiah 10:11

    Jeremiah 10:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Thus shall ye say unto them, The gods that have not made the heavens and the earth, even they shall perish from the earth, and from under these heavens.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Thus shall you say to them, The gods that have not made the heavens and the earth, even they shall perish from the earth, and from under these heavens.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Thus shall ye say unto them, The gods that have not made the heavens and the earth, these shall perish from the earth, and from under the heavens.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    This is what you are to say to them: The gods who have not made the heavens and the earth will be cut off from the earth and from under the heavens.

    Webster's Revision

    Thus shall ye say unto them, The gods that have not made the heavens and the earth, these shall perish from the earth, and from under the heavens.

    World English Bible

    You shall say this to them: The gods that have not made the heavens and the earth, these shall perish from the earth, and from under the heavens.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Thus shall ye say unto them, The gods that have not made the heavens and the earth, these shall perish from the earth, and from under the heavens.

    Clarke's Commentary on Jeremiah 10:11

    Thus shall ye say unto them - This is the message you shall deliver to the Chaldean idolaters.

    The gods that have not made the heavens and the earth, even they shall perish - Both they and their worshippers shall be destroyed; and idolatry shall finally be destroyed from the earth; and the heavens shall look no more on so great an abomination. It is suffered for a while: but in the end shall be destroyed. This verse is written in a sort of Hebraeo-Syriaco-Chaldee; such a dialect as I suppose was spoken at that time in Babylon, or during the captivity. As it is a message to the Babylonians therefore, it is given in their own language. The Chaldee makes it the beginning of the copy of the epistle which the Prophet Jeremiah sent to the rest of the elders of the captivity who were in Babylon. All the ancient Versions acknowledge this verse; and it is found in all MSS. hitherto collated, except one of Dr. Kennicott's numbered 526; and he has included it between lines, as doubting its authenticity. Dr. Blayney supposes that some public teacher during the captivity, deducing it by direct inference from the prophet's words, had it inserted in the margin, and perhaps usually read together with this section, in the assemblies of the people, in order that they might have their answer always ready, whenever they were molested on the point of religion, or importuned to join the idolatrous worship of the Chaldeans.

    Dahler has left it entirely out of the text, and introduces it in a note thus: - "After Jeremiah 10:10 the Hebrew text is interrupted by a verse written in the Chaldean or Babylonish tongue. It is thus expressed: -

    Ye shall say unto them, Let the gods perish!

    Who have not made the heavens and the earth.

    Let them be banished from above the earth,

    and from under the heavens.

    This verse can be considered only as a foreign insertion, not only on account of the difference of the language, but also because it interrupts the natural course of the ideas, and of the connection of the tenth and twelfth verses."

    As a curiosity I shall insert it in Hebrew, which the reader may compare with the Chaldee text, which I also subjoin.

    כזאת תאמרו להם האלהים אשר לא עשו השמים והארץ יאבדו מן הארץ ומן תחת השמים אלה cazoth tomeru lahem; haelohim asher lo asu hashshamayim vehaarets, yobedu min haarets, umin tachath hashshamayim elleh. כדנא תאמרון להון אלהיא די שמיא וארקא לא עבדו יאבדו מארעא ומן תחות שמיא אלה kidna temerun lehon; elahaiya di shemaiya vearka la abadu, yebadu meara umin techoth shemaiya elleh.

    The Hebrew is the translation of Leusden; the Chaldee is that of the common text. Had not all the ancient Versions acknowledged it, I also, principally on account of the strangeness of the language, as being neither Chaldee nor Syriac, should have doubted its authenticity.

    Barnes' Notes on Jeremiah 10:11

    This verse is (in the original) in Chaldee. It was probably a proverbial saying, which Jeremiah inserts in its popular form.