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Jeremiah 30:1

    Jeremiah 30:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    The word that came to Jeremiah from the LORD, saying,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    The word that came to Jeremiah from the LORD, saying,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    The word that came to Jeremiah from Jehovah, saying,

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    The word which came to Jeremiah from the Lord, saying,

    Webster's Revision

    The word that came to Jeremiah from Jehovah, saying,

    World English Bible

    The word that came to Jeremiah from Yahweh, saying,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    The word that came to Jeremiah from the LORD, saying,

    Clarke's Commentary on Jeremiah 30:1

    The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord - This prophecy was delivered about a year after the taking of Jerusalem; so Dahler. Dr. Blayney supposes it and the following chapter to refer to the future restoration of both Jews and Israelites in the times of the Gospel; though also touching at the restoration from the Babylonish captivity, at the end of seventy years. Supposing these two chapters to be penned after the taking of Jerusalem, which appears the most natural, they will refer to the same events, one captivity shadowing forth another, and one restoration being the type or pledge of the second.

    Barnes' Notes on Jeremiah 30:1

    In Jeremiah 30-39, not all written at the same time, are gathered together whatsoever God had revealed to Jeremiah of happier import for the Jewish people. This subject is "the New covenant." In contrast then with the rolls of Jehoiakim and Zedekiah, we here have one containing the nation's hope. A considerable portion was written in the 10th year of Zedekiah, when famine and pestilence were busy in the city, its capture daily more imminent, and the prophet himself in prison. Yet in this sad pressure of earthly troubles Jeremiah could bid his countrymen look courageously onward to the fulfillment of those hopes, which had so constantly in his darkest hours comforted the heart and nerved the arm of the Jew. The scroll consists of three portions:

    (1) "a triumphal hymn of Israel's salvation," Jeremiah 30-31;

    (2) Jeremiah 32; and

    (3) Jeremiah 33.