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Job 1:20

    Job 1:20 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Then Job arose, and rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshipped,

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Then Job arose, and rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down on the ground, and worshipped,

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Then Job arose, and rent his robe, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshipped;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then Job got up, and after parting his clothing and cutting off his hair, he went down on his face to the earth, and gave worship, and said,

    Webster's Revision

    Then Job arose, and rent his robe, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshipped;

    World English Bible

    Then Job arose, and tore his robe, and shaved his head, and fell down on the ground, and worshiped.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Then Job arose, and rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshipped;

    Definitions for Job 1:20

    Mantle - Garment; covering.
    Rent - Divided; broke or tore apart.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 1:20

    Rent his mantle - Tearing the garments, shaving or pulling off the hair of the head, throwing dust or ashes on the head, and fitting on the ground, were acts by which immoderate grief was expressed. Job must have felt the bitterness of anguish when he was told that, in addition to the loss of all his property, he was deprived of his ten children by a violent death. Had he not felt this most poignantly, he would have been unworthy of the name of man.

    Worshipped - Prostrated himself; lay all along upon the ground, with his face in the dust.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 1:20

    Then Job arose - The phrase to arise, in the Scriptures is often used in the sense of beginning to do anything. It does not necessarily imply that the person had been previously sitting; see 2 Samuel 13:13.

    And rent his mantle - The word here rendered "mantle" מעיל me‛ı̂yl means an upper or outer garment. The dress of Orientals consists principally of an under garment or tunic - not materially differing from the "shirt" with us - except that the sleeves are wider, and under this large and loose pantaloons. Niebuhr, Reisebescreib. 1. 157. Over these garments they often throw a full and flowing mantle or robe. This is made without sleeves; it reaches down to the ankles; and when they walk or exercise it is bound around the middle with a girdle or sash. When they labor it is usually laid aside. The robe here referred ire was worn sometimes by women, 2 Samuel 13:18; by men of birth and rank, and by kings, 1 Samuel 15:27; 1 Samuel 18:4; 1 Samuel 24:5, 1 Samuel 24:11; by priests, 1 Samuel 28:14, and especially by the high priest under the ephod, Exodus 28:31. See Braun de vest Sacerd. ii. 5. Schroeder de vest. muller.

    Hebrew p. 267; Hartmann Ilcbraerin, iii. p. 512, and Thesau. Antiq. Sacra. by Ugolin, Tom. i. 509, iii. 74, iv. 504, viii. 90, 1000, xii. 788, xiii. 306; compare the notes at Matthew 5:40, and Niebuhr, as quoted above. The custom of rending the garment as an expression of grief prevailed not only among the Jews but also among the Greeks and Romans 54y i. 13. Suetonius, in "Jul. Caes." 33. It prevailed also among the Persians. Curtius, B. x. c. 5, section 17. See Christian Boldich, in Thesau. Antiq. Sacra. Tom. xii. p. 145; also Tom. xiii. 551, 552, 560, xxx. 1105, 1112. In proof also that the custom prevailed among the Pagan, see Diod. Sic. Lib. i. p. 3, c. 3, respecting the Egyptians; Lib. xvii. respecting the Persians; Quin. Curt. iii. 11; Herod. Lib. iii. in Thalia, Lib. viii. in Urania, where he speaks of the Persians. So Plutarch in his life of Antony, speaking of the deep grief of Cleopatra, says, περίεῤῥηξατο τοῦς πέπλους επ ̓ αὐτῷ perierrēcato tous piplous ep' autō. Thus, Herodian, Lib. i.: καῖ ῥηξαμένη εσθῆτα kai rēcamenē esthēta. So Statius in Glaucum:

    Tu mode fusus humi, lucem aversaris iniquam,

    Nunc torvus pariter vestes, et pectora rumpis.

    So Virgil:

    Tune pins Aeneas humeris abscindere vestem,

    Auxilioque vocare Deos, et tendere palmas.

    Aeneid v. 685.

    Demittunt mentes; it scissa veste Latinus,

    Conjugis attonitus fatis, urbisque ruina,

    Aeneid 12:609.

    So Juvenal, Sat. x.:

    ut primos edere planctus

    continued...

    Wesley's Notes on Job 1:20

    1:20 Shaved - Caused his hair to be shaved or cut off, which was then an usual ceremony in mourning. Worshipped - Instead of cursing God, which Satan said he would do, he adored him, and gave him the glory of his sovereignty, of his justice, and of his goodness also, in this most severe dispensation.
    Book: Job