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Job 1:9

    Job 1:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Then Satan answered the LORD, and said, Doth Job fear God for nought?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Then Satan answered the LORD, and said, Does Job fear God for nothing?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Then Satan answered Jehovah, and said, Doth Job fear God for nought?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the Satan said in answer to the Lord, Is it for nothing that Job is a god-fearing man?

    Webster's Revision

    Then Satan answered Jehovah, and said, Doth Job fear God for nought?

    World English Bible

    Then Satan answered Yahweh, and said, "Does Job fear God for nothing?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Then Satan answered the LORD, and said, Doth Job fear God for nought?

    Definitions for Job 1:9

    Doth - To do; to produce; make.
    Nought - Nothing.
    Satan - Adversary.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 1:9

    Doth Job fear God for naught? - Thou hast made it his interest to be exemplary in his conduct: for this assertion Satan gives his reasons in what immediately follows.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 1:9

    Doth Job fear God for nought? - "Is his religion disinterested? Would not anyone be willing to worship God in such circumstances?" The idea is that there was nothing genuine about his piety; that religion could not be tried in prosperity; that Job had an abundant compensation for serving God, and that if the favors conferred on him were taken away, he would be like the rest of mankind. Much of the apparent virtue and religion of the world is the result of circumstances, and the question here proposed "may," it is to be feared, be asked with great propriety of many professors of religion who are rich; it "should" be asked by every professed friend of the Most High, whether his religion is not selfish and mercenary. Is it because God has blessed us with great earthly advantages? Is it the result of mere gratitude? Is it because he has preserved us in peril, or restored us from sickness? Or is it merely because we hope for heaven, and serve God because we trust he will reward us in a future world? All this may be the result of mere selfishness; and of all such persons it may be appropriately asked, "Do they fear God for nought?" True religion is not mere gratitude, nor is it the result of circumstances. It is the love of religion for its own sake - not for reward; it is because the service of God is right in itself, and not merely because heaven is full of glory; it is because God is worthy of our affections and confidence, and not merely because he will bless us - and this religion will live through all external changes, and survive the destruction of the world. It will flourish in poverty as well as when surrounded by affluence; on a bed of pain as well as in vigorous health; when we are calumniated and despised for our attachment to it, as well as when the incense of flattery is burned around us, and the silvery tones of praise fall on our ear; in the cottage as well as the palace; on the pallet of straw as well as on the bed of down.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 1:9

    1:9 For nought - Out of pure love and respect to thee? No. It is policy, not piety, that makes him good; he doth not serve thee, but serveth himself of thee, serving thee for his own ends.
    Book: Job