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Job 14:14

    Job 14:14 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    If a man die, shall he live again? all the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    If a man die, shall he live again? all the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    If a man die, shall he live again ? All the days of my warfare would I wait, Till my release should come.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    If death takes a man, will he come to life again? All the days of my trouble I would be waiting, till the time came for me to be free.

    Webster's Revision

    If a man die, shall he live again ? All the days of my warfare would I wait, Till my release should come.

    World English Bible

    If a man dies, shall he live again? All the days of my warfare would I wait, until my release should come.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    If a man die, shall he live again? all the days of my warfare would I wait, till my release should come.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 14:14

    If a man die, shall he live again? - The Chaldee translates, If a wicked man die, can he ever live again? or, he can never live again. The Syriac and Arabic thus: "If a man die, shall he revive? Yea, all the days of his youth he awaits till his old age come." The Septuagint: "If a man die, shall he live, having accomplished the days of his life? I will endure till I live again." Here is no doubt, but a strong persuasion, of the certainty of the general resurrection.

    All the days of my appointed time - צבאי tsebai, "of my warfare;" see on Job 7:1 (note). Will I await till חליפתי chaliphathi, my renovation, come. This word is used to denote the springing again of grass, Psalm 90:5, Psalm 90:6, after it had once withered, which is in itself a very expressive emblem of the resurrection.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 14:14

    If a man die, shall he live again? - This is a sudden transition in the thought. He had unconsciously worked himself up almost to the belief that man might live again even on the earth. He had asked to be hid somewhere - even in the grave - until the wrath of God should be overpast, and then that God would remember him, and bring him forth again to life. Here he checks himself. It cannot be, he says, that man will live again on the earth. The hope is visionary and vain, and I will endure what is appointed for me, until some change shall come. The question here "shall he live again?" is a strong form of expressing negation. He will not live again on the earth. Any hope of that kind is, therefore, vain, and I will wait until the change come - whatever that may be.

    All the days of my appointed time - צבאי tsâbâ'ı̂y - my warfare; my enlistment; my hard service. See the notes at Job 7:1.

    Will I wait - I will endure with patience my trials. I will not seek to cut short the time of my service.

    Till my change come - What this should be, he does not seem to know. It might be relief from sufferings, or it might be happiness in some future state. At all events, this state of things could not last always, and under his heavy pressure of wo, he concluded to sit down and quietly wait for any change. He was certain of one thing - that life was to be passed over but once - that man could not go over the journey again - that he could not return to the earth and go over his youth or his age again. Grotius, and after him Rosenmuller and Noyes, here quotes a sentiment similar to this from Euripides, in "Supplicibus," verses 1080ff.

    Οἴμοί τί δὴ βροτοῖσιν οὐκ ἔστιν τόδε,

    Νέους δὶς εἶναι, καὶ γέροντας αὐ πάλιν; κ. τ. λ.

    Oimoí ti dē brotoisin ouk estin tode,

    Neous dis einai, kai gerontas au palin; etc.

    The whole passage is thus elegantly translated by Grotius:

    Proh fata! cur non est datum mortalibus

    Duplici juventa, duplici senio frui?

    Intra penates siquid habet incommode,

    Fas seriore corrigi sententia;

    Hoc vita non permittit: at qui bis foret

    continued...
    Book: Job