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Job 14:15

    Job 14:15 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Thou shalt call, and I will answer thee: thou wilt have a desire to the work of thine hands.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    You shall call, and I will answer you: you will have a desire to the work of your hands.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Thou wouldest call, and I would answer thee: Thou wouldest have a desire to the work of thy hands.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    At the sound of your voice I would give an answer, and you would have a desire for the work of your hands.

    Webster's Revision

    Thou wouldest call, and I would answer thee: Thou wouldest have a desire to the work of thy hands.

    World English Bible

    You would call, and I would answer you. You would have a desire to the work of your hands.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Thou shouldest call, and I would answer thee: thou wouldest have a desire to the work of thine hands.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 14:15

    Thou shalt call - Thou shalt say There shall be time no longer: Awake, ye dead! and come to judgment!

    And I will answer thee - My dissolved frame shall be united at thy call; and body and soul shall be rejoined.

    Thou wilt have a desire - תכסף tichsoph, "Thou wilt pant with desire;" or, "Thou wilt yearn over the work of thy hands." God has subjected the creature to vanity, in hope; having determined the resurrection. Man is one of the noblest works of God. He has exhibited him as a master-piece of his creative skill, power, and goodness. Nothing less than the strongest call upon justice could have induced him thus to destroy the work of his hands. No wonder that he has an earnest desire towards it; and that although man dies, and is as water spilt upon the ground that cannot be gathered up again; yet doth he devise means that his banished be not expelled from him. Even God is represented as earnestly longing for the ultimate reviviscence of the sleeping dust. He cannot, he will not, forget the work of his hands.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 14:15

    Thou shalt call, and I will answer thee - This is language taken from courts of justice. It refers, probably, not to a future time, but to the present. "Call thou now, and I will respond." It expresses a desire to come at once to trial; to have the matter adjusted before he should leave the world. He could not bear the idea of going out of the world under the imputations which were lying on him, and he asked for an opportunity to vindicate himself before his Maker; compare the notes at Job 9:16.

    Thou wilt have a desire to the work of thine hands - To me, one of thy creatures. This should, with more propriety, be rendered in the imperative, "do thou have a desire." It is the expression of an earnest wish that God would show an interest in him as one of his creatures, and would bring the matter to a speedy issue. The word here rendered, "have a desire" (תכסף tı̂kâsaph), means literally to be or become "pale" (from כסף keseph), "silver," so called from its paleness, like the Greek ἄργυρος arguros from ἀγρός agros, white); and then the verb means to pine or long after anything, so as to become pale.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 14:15

    14:15 Answer thee - Thou shalt call my soul to thyself: and I will chearfully answer, Here I am: knowing thou wilt have a desire to the work of thy hands - A love for the soul which thou hast made, and new - made by thy grace.
    Book: Job