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Job 15:2

    Job 15:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Should a wise man utter vain knowledge, and fill his belly with the east wind?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Should a wise man utter vain knowledge, and fill his belly with the east wind?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Should a wise man make answer with vain knowledge, And fill himself with the east wind?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Will a wise man make answer with knowledge of no value, or will he give birth to the east wind?

    Webster's Revision

    Should a wise man make answer with vain knowledge, And fill himself with the east wind?

    World English Bible

    "Should a wise man answer with vain knowledge, and fill himself with the east wind?

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Should a wise man make answer with vain knowledge, and fill his belly with the east wind?

    Definitions for Job 15:2

    Vain - Empty; foolish; useless.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 15:2

    Should a wise man utter vain knowledge - Or rather, Should a wise man utter the science of wind? A science without solidity or certainty.

    And fill his belly with the east wind? - בטן beten, which we translate belly, is used to signify any part of the cavity of the body, whether the region of the thorax or abdomen; here it evidently refers to the lungs, and may include the cheeks and fauces. The east wind, קדים kadim, is a very stormy wind in the Levant, or the eastern part of the Mediterranean Sea, supposed to be the same with that called by the Greeks ευροκλυδων, euroclydon, the east storm, mentioned Acts 27:14. Eliphaz, by these words, seems to intimate that Job's speech was a perfect storm or tempest of words.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 15:2

    Should a wise man - Referring to Job, and to his claims to be esteemed wise; see Job 12:3; Job 13:2, Job 13:6. The argument of Eliphaz here is, that the sentiments which Job had advanced were a sufficient refutation of his pretensions to wisdom. A wise man would not be guilty of "mere talk," or of using language that conveyed no ideas.

    Utter - literally, answer. It refers to the replies which Job had made to the arguments of his friends.

    Vain knowledge - Margin, "Knowledge of wind." So the Hebrew; see Job 6:26; Job 7:7. The "wind" is used to denote what is unsubstantial, vain, changing. Here it is used as an emblem of remarks which were vain, empty, and irrelevant.

    And fill his belly - Fill his mind with unsubstantial arguments or sentiments - as little fitted for utility as the east wind is for food. The image is, "he fills himself with mere wind, and then blows it out under pretence of delivering the maxims of wisdom."

    With the east wind - The east wind was not only tempestuous and vehement, but sultry, and destructive to vegetation. It passed over vast deserts, and was characterized by great dryness and heat. It is used here to denote a manner of discourse that had in it nothing profitable.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 15:2

    15:2 Fill - Satisfy his mind and conscience. East wind - With discourses not only unprofitable, but also pernicious both to himself and others; as the east - wind was in those parts.
    Book: Job