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Job 16:22

    Job 16:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    When a few years are come, then I shall go the way whence I shall not return.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    When a few years are come, then I shall go the way from where I shall not return.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For when a few years are come, I shall go the way whence I shall not return.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For in a short time I will take the journey from which I will not come back.

    Webster's Revision

    For when a few years are come, I shall go the way whence I shall not return.

    World English Bible

    For when a few years are come, I shall go the way of no return.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For when a few years are come, I shall go the way whence I shall not return.

    Definitions for Job 16:22

    Whence - From where.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 16:22

    When a few years are come - I prefer Mr. Good's version: -

    "But the years numbered to me are come.

    And I must go the way whence I shall not return."

    Job could not, in his present circumstances, expect a few years of longer life; from his own conviction he was expecting death every hour. The next verse, the first of the following chapter, should come in here:

    My breath is corrupt, etc. - He felt himself as in the arms of death: he saw the grave as already digged which was to receive his dead body. This verse shows that our translation of the twenty-second verse is improper, and vindicates Mr. Good's version.

    I Have said on Job 16:9 that a part of Job's sufferings probably arose from appalling representations made to his eye or to his imagination by Satan and his agents. I think this neither irrational nor improbable. That he and his demons have power to make themselves manifest on especial occasions, has been credited in all ages of the world; not by the weak, credulous, and superstitious only, but also by the wisest, the most learned, and the best of men. I am persuaded that many passages in the Book of Job refer to this, and admit of an easy interpretation on this ground.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 16:22

    When a few years are come - Margin "years of number;" that is, numbered years, or a few years. The same idea is expressed in Job 7:21; see the notes at that place. The idea is, that he must soon die. He desired, therefore, before he went down to the grave, to carry his cause before God, and to have, as he did not doubt he should have, the divine attestation in his favor; compare the notes at Job 19:25-27. Now he was overwhelmed with calamities and reproaches, and was about to die in this condition. He did not wish to die thus. He wished that the reproaches might be wiped off, and that his character might be cleared up and made fair. He believed assuredly that if he could be permitted to carry his cause directly before God, he might be able to vindicate his character, and to obtain the divine verdict in his favor; and if he obtained that, he was not unwilling to die. It is the expression of such a wish as every man has, that his sun may not go down under a cloud; that whatever aspersions may rest on his character may be wiped away; and that his name, if remembered at all when he is dead, may go untarnished down to future times, and be such that his friends may repeat it without a blush.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 16:22

    16:22 Go - To the state and place of the dead, whence men cannot return to this life. The meaning is, my death hastens, and therefore I earnestly desire that the cause depending, between me and my friends, may be determined, that if I be guilty of these things, I may bear the shame of it before all men, and if I be innocent, that I may see my own integrity, and the credit of religion, (which suffers upon this occasion) vindicated. How very certainly, and how very shortly are we likewise to go this journey.
    Book: Job