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Job 18:17

    Job 18:17 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    His remembrance shall perish from the earth, and he shall have no name in the street.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    His remembrance shall perish from the earth, and he shall have no name in the street.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    His remembrance shall perish from the earth, And he shall have no name in the street.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    His memory is gone from the earth, and in the open country there is no knowledge of his name.

    Webster's Revision

    His remembrance shall perish from the earth, And he shall have no name in the street.

    World English Bible

    His memory shall perish from the earth. He shall have no name in the street.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    His remembrance shall perish from the earth, and he shall have no name in the street.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 18:17

    Job 18:Job 7:25

    Job 18:17His remembrance shall perish - He shall have none to survive him, to continue his name among men.

    No name in the street - He shall never be a man of reputation; after his demise, none shall talk of his fame.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 18:17

    His remembrance shall perish - His name - all recollection of him. Calamity shall follow him even after death; and that which every man desires, and every good man has, and honored name when he is dead, will be denied him. Men will hasten to forget him as fast as possible; compare Proverbs 10:7, "The name of the wicked shall rot."

    No name in the street - Men when they meet together in highways and places of concourse - when traveler meets traveler, and caravan caravan, shall not pause to speak of him and of the loss which society has substained by his death. It is one of the rewards of virtue that the good will speak of the upright man when he is dead; that they will pause in their journey, or in their business, to converse about him; and that the poor and the needy will dwell with affectionate interest upon their loss. "This" blessing, Bildad says, will be denied the wicked man. The world will not feel that they have any loss to deplore when he is dead. No great plan of benvolence has been arrested by his removal. The poor and the needy fare as well as they did before. The widow and the fatherless make no grateful remembrance of his name, and the world hastens to forget him as soon as possible. There is no man, except one who is lost to all virtue, who does not desire to be remembered when he is dead - by his children, his neighbors, his friends, and by the stranger who may read the record on the stone that marks his grave. Where this desire is "wholly" extinguished, man has reached the lowest possible point of degradation, and the last hold on him in favor of virtue has expired.
    Book: Job