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Job 18:5

    Job 18:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Yea, the light of the wicked shall be put out, and the spark of his fire shall not shine.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Yes, the light of the wicked shall be put out, and the spark of his fire shall not shine.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Yea, the light of the wicked shall be put out, And the spark of his fire shall not shine.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For the light of the sinner is put out, and the flame of his fire is not shining.

    Webster's Revision

    Yea, the light of the wicked shall be put out, And the spark of his fire shall not shine.

    World English Bible

    "Yes, the light of the wicked shall be put out, The spark of his fire shall not shine.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Yea, the light of the wicked shall be put out, and the spark of his fire shall not shine.

    Definitions for Job 18:5

    Yea - Yes; certainly.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 18:5

    The light of the wicked shall be put out - Some think it would be better to translate the original, "Let the light of the wicked be extinguished!" Thou art a bad man, and thou hast perverted the understanding which God hath given thee. Let that understanding, that abused gift, be taken away. From this verse to the end of the chapter is a continual invective against Job.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 18:5

    Yea - Truly; or, behold. Bildad here commences his remarks on the certain destiny of the wicked, and strings together a number of apparently proverbial sayings, showing that calamity in various forms would certainly overtake the wicked. There is nothing particularly new in his argument, though the use of the various images which he employs shows how deep was the conviction of this doctrine at that time, and how extensively it prevailed.

    The light of the wicked shall be put out - Light here is an emblem of prosperity.

    The spark of his fire - Hebrew the flame of his fire. There may be an allusion here to the customs of Arabian hospitality. This was, and is, their national glory, and it is their boast that no one is ever refused it. The emblem of fire or flame here may refer to the custom of kindling a fire on an eminence, near a dwelling, to attract the stranger to share the hospitality of the owner of it; or it may refer to the fire in his tent, which the stranger was always at liberty to share. In the collection of the Arabian poems, called the Hamasa, this idea occurs almost in the words of Bildad. The extract was furnished me by the Rev. Eli Smith. It is a boast of Salamiel, a prince of Tema. In extolling the virtues of his tribe, he says, "No fire of ours was ever extinguished at night without a guest; and of our guests never did one disparage us." The idea here is, that the wicked would attempt to show hospitality, but the means would be taken away. He would not be permitted to enjoy the coveted reputation of showing it to the stranger, and the fire which might invite the traveler, or which might confer comfort on him, would be put out in his dwelling. The inability to extend the offer of a liberal hospitality would be equivalent to the deepest poverty or the most trying affliction.
    Book: Job