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Job 20:15

    Job 20:15 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    He hath swallowed down riches, and he shall vomit them up again: God shall cast them out of his belly.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    He has swallowed down riches, and he shall vomit them up again: God shall cast them out of his belly.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    He hath swallowed down riches, and he shall vomit them up again; God will cast them out of his belly.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    He takes down wealth as food, and sends it up again; it is forced out of his stomach by God.

    Webster's Revision

    He hath swallowed down riches, and he shall vomit them up again; God will cast them out of his belly.

    World English Bible

    He has swallowed down riches, and he shall vomit them up again. God will cast them out of his belly.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    He hath swallowed down riches, and he shall vomit them up again: God shall cast them out of his belly.

    Definitions for Job 20:15

    Cast - Worn-out; old; cast-off.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 20:15

    He shall vomit them up again - This is also an allusion to an effect of most ordinary poisons; they occasion a nausea, and often excruciating vomiting; nature striving to eject what it knows, if retained, will be its bane.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 20:15

    He hath swallowed down riches - He has "glutted" down riches - or gormandized them - or devoured them greedily. The Hebrew word בלע bela‛, means "to absorb, to devour with the idea of greediness." It is descriptive of the voracity of a wild beast, and means here that he had devoured them eagerly, or voraciously.

    And he shall vomit - As an epicure does that which he has drunk or swallowed with delight. "Noyes." The idea is, that he shall lose that which he has acquired, and that it will be attended with loathing. All this is to a great extent true still, and may be applied to those who aim to accumulate wealth, and to lay up ill gotten gold. It will be ruinous to their peace; and the time will come when it will be looked on with inexpressible loathing. Zophar meant, undoubtedly, to apply this to Job, and to infer, that since it was a settled maxim that such would be the result of the ill-gotten gain of a wicked man, where a result like this "had" happened, that there must have been wickedness. How cutting and severe this must have been to Job can be easily conceived. The Septuagint renders this, "Out of his house let an angel drag him."
    Book: Job