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Job 20:2

    Job 20:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Therefore do my thoughts cause me to answer, and for this I make haste.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Therefore do my thoughts cause me to answer, and for this I make haste.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Therefore do my thoughts give answer to me, Even by reason of my haste that is in me.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For this cause my thoughts are troubling me and driving me on.

    Webster's Revision

    Therefore do my thoughts give answer to me, Even by reason of my haste that is in me.

    World English Bible

    "Therefore do my thoughts give answer to me, even by reason of my haste that is in me.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Therefore do my thoughts give answer to me, even by reason of my haste that is in me.

    Definitions for Job 20:2

    Haste - To hurry; to urge on quickly.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 20:2

    Therefore do my thoughts - It has already been observed that Zophar was the most inveterate of all Job's enemies, for we really must cease to call them friends. He sets no bounds to his invective, and outrages every rule of charity. A man of such a bitter spirit must have been, in general, very unhappy. With him Job is, by insinuation, every thing that is base, vile, and hypocritical. Mr. Good translates this verse thus: "Whither would my tumult transport me? And how far my agitation within me?" This is all the modesty that appears in Zophar's discourse. He acknowledges that he is pressed by the impetuosity of his spirit to reply to Job's self-vindication. The original is variously translated, but the sense is as above.

    For this I make haste - ובעבור חושי בי ubaabur chushi bi, there is sensibility in me, and my feelings provoke me to reply.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 20:2

    Therefore - לכן lākên, "certainly, truly." In view of what has been just said. Or perhaps the word means merely certainly, truly.

    Do my thoughts cause me to answer - This is variously rendered. The Vulgate renders it, Idcirco cogitationes meae variae succedunt sibi, et mens in diversa rapitur - "Therefore my various thoughts follow in succession, and the mind is distracted." The Septuagint, "I did not suppose that thou wouldst speak against these things, and you do not understand more than I." How this was ever made from the Hebrew it is impossible to say. On the word "thoughts," see the notes at Job 4:13. The word denotes thoughts which divide and distract the mind; not calm and collected reflections, but those which disturb, disconcert, and trouble. He acknowledges that it was not calm reflection which induced him to reply, but the agitating emotions produced by the speech of Job. The word rendered "cause me to answer" (ישׁיבוּני yeshı̂ybûnı̂y), "cause me to return" - and Jerome understood it as meaning that his thoughts returned upon him in quick and troublesome succession, and says in his Commentary on Job, that the meaning is, "I am troubled and agitated because you say that you sustain these evils from God without cause, when nothing evil ought to be suspected of God."

    And for this I make haste - Margin, "my haste is in me." The meaning is, "the impetuosity of my feelings urges me on. I reply on account of the agitation of my soul, which will admit of no delay." His heart was full, and he hastened to give vent to his feelings in impassioned and earnest language.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 20:2

    20:2 Therefore - For this thy severe sentence. Make haste - I speak sooner than I intended. And possibly interrupted Job, when he was proceeding in his discourse.
    Book: Job