Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Job 20:6

    Job 20:6 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Though his excellency mount up to the heavens, and his head reach unto the clouds;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Though his excellency mount up to the heavens, and his head reach to the clouds;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Though his height mount up to the heavens, And his head reach unto the clouds;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Though he is lifted up to the heavens, and his head goes up to the clouds;

    Webster's Revision

    Though his height mount up to the heavens, And his head reach unto the clouds;

    World English Bible

    Though his height mount up to the heavens, and his head reach to the clouds,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Though his excellency mount up to the heavens, and his head reach unto the clouds;

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 20:6

    Though his excellency mount up to the heavens - Probably referring to the original state of Adam, of whose fall he appears to have spoken, Job 20:4. He was created in the image of God; but by his sin against his Maker he fell into wretchedness, misery, death, and destruction.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 20:6

    Though his excellency mount up to the heavens - Though he attain to the highest pitch of honor and prosperity. The Septuagint renders this, "Though his gifts should go up to heaven, and his sacrifice should touch the clouds;" a sentence conveying a true and a beautiful idea, but which is not a translation of the Hebrew. The phrases, to go up to heaven, and to touch the clouds, often occur to denote anything that is greatly exalted, or that is very high. Thus, in Virgil,

    It clamor coelo.

    So Horace,

    Sublimi feriam sidera vertice.

    And again,

    Attingit solium Joyis.

    Compare Genesis 11:4, "Let us build us a tower whose top may reach unto heaven." In Homer the expression not unfrequently occurs, τοῦ γὰρ κλέος οὐρανὸν ἵκει tou gar kleos ouranon hikei. In Seneca (Thyest. Act. v. ver. 1, 2,4,) similar expressions occur:

    Aequalis astris gradior, et cunctos super

    Altum superbo vertice attingens polum,

    Dimitto superos: summa votorum attigi.

    The "language" of Zophar would also well express the condition of many a hypocrite whose piety seems to be of the most exalted character, and who appears to have made most eminent attainments in religion. Such a man may "seem" to be a man of uncommon excellence. He may attract attention as having extraordinary sanctity. He may seem to have a remarkable spirit of prayer, and yet all may be false and hollow. Men who design to be hypocrites, aim usually to be "eminent" hypocrites; they who have true piety often, alas, aim at a much lower standard. A hypocrite cannot keep himself in countenance, or accomplish his purpose of imposing on the world, without the appearance of extraordinary devotedness to God; many a sincere believer is satisfied with much less of the appearance of religion. He is sincere and honest. He is conscious of true piety, and he attempts to impose on none. At the same time he makes no attempt scarcely "to be" what the hypocrite wishes "to appear" to be; and hence, the man that shall appear to be the most eminently devoted to God "may" be a hypocrite - yet usually not long. His zeal dies away, or he is suffered to fall into open sin, and to show that he had no true religion at heart.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 20:6

    20:6 Though - Though he be advanced to great dignity and authority.
    Book: Job