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Job 22:17

    Job 22:17 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Which said unto God, Depart from us: and what can the Almighty do for them?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Which said to God, Depart from us: and what can the Almighty do for them?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Who said unto God, Depart from us; And, What can the Almighty do for us?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Who said to God, Go away from us; and, What is the Ruler of all able to do to us?

    Webster's Revision

    Who said unto God, Depart from us; And, What can the Almighty do for us?

    World English Bible

    who said to God, 'Depart from us;' and, 'What can the Almighty do for us?'

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Who said unto God, Depart from us; and, What can the Almighty do for us?

    Barnes' Notes on Job 22:17

    Which said unto God, Depart from us - Notes, Job 21:14. A very correct description of the old world. They had no wish to retain God in their knowledge. Probably Eliphaz here refers to what Job had said, Job 21:14-15. He had remarked, in describing the wicked, that they said unto God, "Depart from us," and yet they lived prosperously. "But see," says Eliphaz,'" a case" where they did this. It was done by the inhabitants of the world before the deluge, and their houses were filled, as you say the houses of the wicked are, with good things, but God swept them all suddenly away."

    And what can the Almighty do for them? - Margin, or," to." That is, they demanded what the Almighty could do for them. They did not feel their dependence on him; they did not admit that they needed his aid; they cast off all reliance on him. This whole passage is a most sarcastic retort on what Job had said in Job 21:14-15. He had affirmed that though wicked people used this language, yet that they prospered. Eliphaz takes the same language and applies it to the sinners before the deluge, and says that they expressed themselves just in this manner. The language which Job puts into the mouths of the wicked, had indeed, says Eliphaz, been used. But by whom? By those who lived in security and prosperity. "By the men before the deluge," says he, "the race that was so wicked that it was necessary to cut them off by the flood. These are the people to whose sentiments Job appeals; these the people with whom he has sympathy!"
    Book: Job