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Job 23:13

    Job 23:13 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But he is in one mind, and who can turn him? and what his soul desireth, even that he doeth.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But he is in one mind, and who can turn him? and what his soul desires, even that he does.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But he is in one mind , and who can turn him? And what his soul desireth, even that he doeth.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But his purpose is fixed and there is no changing it; and he gives effect to the desire of his soul.

    Webster's Revision

    But he is in one mind , and who can turn him? And what his soul desireth, even that he doeth.

    World English Bible

    But he stands alone, and who can oppose him? What his soul desires, even that he does.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But he is in one mind, and who can turn him? and what his soul desireth, even that he doeth.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 23:13

    But he is in one mind - The original is והוא באחד vehu beechad, and is literally, But he is in one: properly rendered by the Vulgate, Ipse enim solus est. But he is alone. And not badly rendered by Coverdale - It is he himself alone. He has no partner; his designs are his own, they are formed in his infinite wisdom, and none can turn his determinations aside. It is vain, therefore, for man to contend with his Maker. He designs my happiness, and you cannot prevent its accomplishment.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 23:13

    But he is in one mind - He is unchangeable. He has formed his plans, and no one can divert him from them. Of the truth of this sentiment there can be no dispute. The only difficulty in the case is to see why Job adverted to it here, and how it bears on the train of thought which he was pursuing. The idea seems to be, that God was now accomplishing his eternal purposes in respect to him; that he had formed a plan far back in eternal ages, and that that plan must be executed; that he was a Sovereign, and that however mysterious his plans might be, it was vain to contend with them, and that man ought to submit to their execution with patience and resignation. Job expected yet that God would come forth and vindicate him; but at present all that he could do was to submit. He did not pretend to understand the reason of the divine dispensations; he felt that he had no power to resist God. The language here is that of a man who is perplexed in regard to the divine dealings, but who feels that they are all in accordance with the unchangeable purpose of God.

    And what his soul desireth, even that he doeth - He does what he pleases. None can resist or control him. It is vain, therefore, to contend against him. From this passage we see that the doctrine of divine sovereignty was understood at a very early age of the world, and entered undoubtedly into the religion of the patriarchs. It was then seen and felt that God was absolute; that he was not dependent on his creatures; that he acted according to a plan; that he was inflexible in regard to that plan, and that it was in vain to attempt to resist its execution. It is, when properly understood, a matter of unspeakable consolation that God has a plan - for who could honor a God who had "no" plan, but who did everything by hap-hazard? It is matter of rejoicing that he has "one" great purpose which extends through all ages, and which embraces all things - for then everything falls into its proper place, and has its appropriate bearing on other events. It is a matter of joy that God "does" execute all his purposes; for as they are all good and wise, it is "desirable" that they should be executed. It would be a calamity if a good plan were not executed. Why then should people complain at the purposes or the decrees of God?
    Book: Job