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Job 23:7

    Job 23:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    There the righteous might dispute with him; so should I be delivered for ever from my judge.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    There the righteous might dispute with him; so should I be delivered for ever from my judge.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    There the upright might reason with him; So should I be delivered for ever from my judge.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    There an upright man might put his cause before him; and I would be free for ever from my judge.

    Webster's Revision

    There the upright might reason with him; So should I be delivered for ever from my judge.

    World English Bible

    There the upright might reason with him, so I should be delivered forever from my judge.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    There the upright might reason with him; so should I be delivered for ever from my judge.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 23:7

    There the righteous might dispute with him - נוכח nochach, might argue or plead. To dispute with God sounds very harsh.

    So should I be delivered for ever - Mr. Good translates: "And triumphantly should I escape from my condemnation." The Hebrew word לנצח lanetsach may as well be translated to victory as for ever: and in this sense the Vulgate understood the words: Proponat aequitatem contra me; et perveniat ad victoriam judicium meum. "He would set up equity against me; and would lead on my cause to victory." Coverdale renders thus: - But let hym give me like power to go to lawe, then am I sure to wynne my matter. Nothing less than the fullest conviction of his own innocence could have led Job to express himself thus to the Judge of quick and dead!

    Barnes' Notes on Job 23:7

    There the righteous might dispute with him - One who is conscious of his integrity might carry his cause there, with the assurance that he would be heard, and that justice would be done him. There can be no doubt that Job here refers to himself, though. he speaks in the third person, and advances this as a general proposition.

    So shall I be delivered forever from my judge - From him who would judge or condemn me (משׁפטי mı̂shâphaṭı̂y). He does not here refer to "God," as if he would be delivered from him, but to anyone who would attempt to judge and condemn him, as his friends had done. The meaning is, that having, as he confidently expected he would, obtained the verdict of God in his favor, he would be ever after free from condemnation. The decision would be final. There was no higher tribunal, and no one would dare to condemn him afterward. This shows his consciousness of integrity. It may be applied to ourselves - to all. If we can obtain, at the last day, when our cause shall be brought before God, the divine verdict in our favor, it will settle the matter forever. No one, after that, will condemn us; never again shall our character or conduct be put on trial. The divine decision of that day will settle the question to all eternity. How momentous, then, is it that we should so live as to be acquitted in that day, and to have "an eternal sentence" in our favour!

    Wesley's Notes on Job 23:7

    23:7 There - At that throne of grace, where God lays aside his majesty, and judges according to his wonted clemency. Dispute - Humbly propounding the grounds of their confidence. So - Upon such a fair and equal hearing. Delivered - From the damnatory sentence of God. This and some such expressions of Job cannot be excused from irreverence towards God, for which God afterwards reproves him, and Job abhorreth himself.
    Book: Job