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Job 24:19

    Job 24:19 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Drought and heat consume the snow waters: so doth the grave those which have sinned.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Drought and heat consume the snow waters: so does the grave those which have sinned.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Drought and heat consume the snow waters:'so doth'sheol those that have sinned.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Snow waters become dry with the heat: so do sinners go down into the underworld.

    Webster's Revision

    Drought and heat consume the snow waters:'so doth'sheol those that have sinned.

    World English Bible

    Drought and heat consume the snow waters, so does Sheol those who have sinned.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Drought and heat consume the snow waters: so doth Sheol those which have sinned.

    Definitions for Job 24:19

    Doth - To do; to produce; make.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 24:19

    Drought and heat consume the snow-waters - The public cisterns or large tanks which had been filled with water by the melting of the snow on the mountains, and which water was stored for the irrigation of their lands, had been entirely exhausted by the intensity of the heat, and the long continuance of drought.

    So doth the grave those which have sinned - For this whole paragraph we have only two words in the original; viz., שאול חטאו sheol chatau, "the pit, they have sinned;" which Mr. Good translates: - "They fall to their lowest depth." I believe the meaning to be, - even the deepest tanks, which held most water, and retained it longest, had become exhausted; so that expectation and succor were cut off from this as well as from every other quarter. I have elsewhere shown that שאול sheol signifies, not only hell and the grave, but any deep pit; and, also, that חטא chata signifies to miss the mark. Mr. Good, properly aware of these acceptations of the original words, has translated as above; and it is the only ground on which any consistent meaning can be given to the original.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 24:19

    Drought and heat consume the snow-waters - Margin, "violently take;" see the notes at Job 6:17. The word rendered "consume," and in the margin "violently take" (יגזלו yı̂gâzelû), means properly to strip off, as skin from the flesh; and then to pluck or tear away by force; to strip, to spoil, to rob. The meaning here is, that the heat seems to seize and carry away the snow waters - to bear them off, as a plunderer does spoil. There is much poetic beauty in this image. The "snow-waters" here mean the waters that are produced by the melting of the snow on the hills, and which swell the rivulets in the valleys below. Those waters, Job says, are borne along in rivulets over the burning sands, until the drought and heat absorb them all, and they vanish away; see the beautiful description of this which Job gives in Job 6:15-18. Those waters vanish away silently and gently. The stream becomes smaller and smaller as it winds along in the desert until it all disappears. So Job says it is with these wicked people whom he is describing. Instead of being violently cut off; instead of being hurried out of life by some sudden and dreadful judgment, as his friends maintained, they were suffered to linger on calmly and peaceably - as the stream glides on gently in the desert - until they quietly disappear by death - as the waters sink gently in the sands or evaporate in the air. The whole description is that of a peaceful death as contradistinguished from one of violence.

    So doth the grave those who have sinned - There is a wonderful terseness and energy in the original words here, which is very feebly expressed by our translation. The Hebrew is (חטאו שׁאול she'ôl châṭâ'û) "the grave, they have sinned." The sense is correctly expressed in the common version. The meaning is, that they who have sinned die in the same quiet and gentle manner with which waters vanish in the desert. By those who have sinned, Job means those to whom he had just referred - robbers, adulterers, murderers, etc., and the sense of the whole is, that they died a calm and peaceful death; see the notes at Job 21:13, where he advances the same sentiment as here.
    Book: Job