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Job 26:2

    Job 26:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    How hast thou helped him that is without power? how savest thou the arm that hath no strength?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    How have you helped him that is without power? how save you the arm that has no strength?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    How hast thou helped him that is without power! How hast thou saved the arm that hath no strength!

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    How have you given help to him who has no power! how have you been the salvation of the arm which has no strength!

    Webster's Revision

    How hast thou helped him that is without power! How hast thou saved the arm that hath no strength!

    World English Bible

    "How have you helped him who is without power! How have you saved the arm that has no strength!

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    How hast thou helped him that is without power! how hast thou saved the arm that hath no strength!

    Definitions for Job 26:2

    Without - Outside.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 26:2

    How hast thou helped him - This seems a species of irony. How wonderfully hast thou counselled the unskilful and strengthened the weak! Alas for you! ye could not give what ye did not possess! In this way the Chaldee understood these verses: "Why hast thou pretended to give succor, when thou art without strength? And save, while thy arm is weak? Why hast thou given counsel, when thou art without understanding? And supposest that thou hast shown the very essence of wisdom?"

    Job 26:2, 3That is, to the man totally deprived of strength, power, and wisdom.

    "Ye that rejoice (ללא דבר lelo dabar) in nothing."

    Barnes' Notes on Job 26:2

    How hast thou helped him that is without power? - It has been doubted whether this refers to Job himself, the two friends of Bildad, or to the Deity. Rosenmuller. The connection, however, seems to demand that it should be referred to Job himself. It is sarcastical. Bildad had come as a friend and comforter. He had, also, in common with Eliphaz and Zophar, taken upon himself the office of teacher and counsellor. He had regarded Job as manifesting great weakness in his views of God and of his government; as destitute of all strength to bear up aright under trials, and now all that he had done to aid one so weak was found in the impertinent and irrelevant generalities of his brief speech. Job is indignant that one with such pretensions should have said nothing more to the purpose. Herder, however, renders this as if it related wholly to God, and it cannot be denied that the Hebrew would bear this:

    "Whom helpest thou? Him who hath no strength?

    Whom dost thou vindicate? Him whose arm hath no power?

    To whom give counsel? One without wisdom?

    Truly much wisdom hast thou taught him."

    How savest thou the arm that hath no strength? - That is, your remarks are not adapted to invigorate the feeble. He had come professedly to comfort and support his afflicted friend in his trials. Yet Job asks what there was in his observations that was fitted to produce this effect? Instead of declaiming on the majesty and greatness of God, he should have said something that was adapted to relieve an afflicted and a troubled soul.
    Book: Job