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Job 26:8

    Job 26:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    He bindeth up the waters in his thick clouds; and the cloud is not rent under them.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    He binds up the waters in his thick clouds; and the cloud is not rent under them.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    He bindeth up the waters in his thick clouds; And the cloud is not rent under them.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    By him the waters are shut up in his thick clouds, and the cloud does not give way under them.

    Webster's Revision

    He bindeth up the waters in his thick clouds; And the cloud is not rent under them.

    World English Bible

    He binds up the waters in his thick clouds, and the cloud is not burst under them.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    He bindeth up the waters in his thick clouds; and the cloud is not rent under them.

    Definitions for Job 26:8

    Rent - Divided; broke or tore apart.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 26:8

    He bindeth up the waters - Drives the aqueous particles together, which were raised by evaporation, so that, being condensed, they form clouds which float in the atmosphere, till, meeting with strong currents of wind, or by the agency of the electric fluid, they are farther condensed; and then, becoming too heavy to be sustained in the air, fall down in the form of rain, when, in this poetic language, the cloud is rent under them.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 26:8

    He bindeth up the waters in his thick clouds - That is, he seems to do it, or to collect the waters in the clouds, as in bottles or vessels. The clouds appear to hold the waters, as if bound up, until he is pleased to send them drop by drop upon the earth.

    And the cloud is not rent under them - The wonder which Job here expresses is, that so large a quantity of water as is poured down from the clouds, should be held suspended in the air without seeming to rend the cloud, and falling all at once. His image is that of a bottle, or vessel, filled with water, suspended in the air, and which is not rent. What were the views which he had of the clouds, of course it is impossible now to say. If he regarded them as they are, as vapors, or if he considered them to be a more solid substance, capable of holding water, there was equal ground for wonder. In the former case, his amazement would have arisen from the fact, that so light, fragile, and evanescent a substance as vapor should contain so large a quantity of water; in the latter case, his wonder would have been that such a substance should distil its contents drop by drop. There is equal reason for admiring the wisdom of God in the production of rain, now that the cause is understood. The clouds are collections of vapors. They contain moisture, or vapor, which ascends from the earth, and which is held in suspension when in small particles in the clouds; as, when a room is swept, the small particles of dust will be seen to float in the room. When these small particles are attracted, and form masses as large as drops, the air will no longer sustain them, and they fall to the earth. Man never could have devised a way for causing rain; and the mode in which it is provided that large quantities of water shall be borne from one place to another in the air, and made to fall when it is needed, by which the vapors that ascend from the ocean shall not be suffered to fall again into the ocean, but shall be carried on to the land, is adapted to excite our admiration of the wisdom of God now, no less than it was in the time of Job.
    Book: Job