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Job 27:16

    Job 27:16 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Though he heap up silver as the dust, and prepare raiment as the clay;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Though he heap up silver as the dust, and prepare raiment as the clay;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Though he heap up silver as the dust, And prepare raiment as the clay;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Though he may get silver together like dust, and make ready great stores of clothing;

    Webster's Revision

    Though he heap up silver as the dust, And prepare raiment as the clay;

    World English Bible

    Though he heap up silver as the dust, and prepare clothing as the clay;

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Though he heap up silver as the dust, and prepare raiment as the clay;

    Definitions for Job 27:16

    Raiment - Clothing; apparel; covering.

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 27:16

    Though he heap up silver - Though he amass riches in the greatest abundance, he shall not enjoy them. Unsanctified wealth is a curse to its possessor. Money, of all earthly possessions, is the most dangerous, as it is the readiest agent to do good or evil. He that perverts it is doubly cursed, because it affords him the most immediate means of sinful gratification; and he can sin more in an hour through this, than he can in a day or week by any other kind of property. On the other hand, they who use it aright have it in their power to do the most prompt and immediate good. Almost every kind of want may be speedily relieved by it. Hence, he who uses it as he ought is doubly blessed; while he who abuses it is doubly cursed.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 27:16

    Though he heap up silver as the dust - That is, in great quantities - as plenty as dust; compare 1 Kings 10:27, "And the king made silver to be in Jerusalem as stones."

    And prepare raiment - Oriental wealth consisted much in changes of raiment. Sir John Chardin says that in the East it is common to gather together immense quantities of furniture and clothes. According to D'Herbelot, Bokteri, an illustrious poet; of Cufah in the ninth century, had so many presents made him in the course of his life, that when he died he was found possessed of an hundred complete suits of clothes, two hundred shirts, and five hundred turbans. compare Ezra 2:69, and Nehemiah 7:70 see Bochart IIieroz. P. II. Lib. iv. c. xxv. p. 617. This species of treasure is mentioned by Virgil;

    Dives equom, dives pictai vestis et auri.

    Aeneid ix. 26.

    The reason why wealth consisted so much in changes of raiment, is to be found in the fondness for display in Oriental countries, and in the fact that as fashions never change there, such treasures are valuable until they are worn out. In the ever-varying fashions of the West such treasures are comparatively of much less value.

    As the clay - As the dust of the streets; or as abundant as mire.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 27:16

    27:16 As clay - In great abundance.
    Book: Job