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Job 27:2

    Job 27:2 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    As God liveth, who hath taken away my judgment; and the Almighty, who hath vexed my soul;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    As God lives, who has taken away my judgment; and the Almighty, who has vexed my soul;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    As God liveth, who hath taken away my right, And the Almighty, who hath vexed my soul:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    By the life of God, who has taken away my right; and of the Ruler of all, who has made my soul bitter;

    Webster's Revision

    As God liveth, who hath taken away my right, And the Almighty, who hath vexed my soul:

    World English Bible

    "As God lives, who has taken away my right, the Almighty, who has made my soul bitter.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    As God liveth, who hath taken away my right; and the Almighty, who hath vexed my soul;

    Clarke's Commentary on Job 27:2

    Who hath taken away my judgment - Who has turned aside my cause, and has not permitted it to come to a hearing, where I might have justice done to me, but has abandoned me to the harsh and uncharitable judgment of my enemies? There appears to be a great want of reverence in these words of Job; he speaks with a degree of irritation, if not bitterness, which cannot be justified. No man should speak thus of his Maker.

    Barnes' Notes on Job 27:2

    As God liveth - A form of solemn adjuration, or an oath by the living God. "As certainly as God lives." It is the form by which God himself often swears; see Ezekiel 14:16; Ezekiel 33:11, and is often employed by others; 1 Samuel 20:3; 1 Samuel 25:26.

    Who hath taken away my judgment - Who hath rejected my cause, or who has refused me justice; that is, who has treated me as though I was guilty, and withholds from me relief. The language is forensic, and the idea is, that he would make his solemn appeal to him, even though he had rejected his cause. Perhaps there is implied here more than the solemnity of an ordinary oath. A man might be supposed to be willing to make his appeal to one who had shown himself friendly or favorable to him, but he would manifest more reluctance to making his appeal in an important case to a judge who had decided against him, especially if that decision was regarded as severe, and if that judge had refused to hear what he had to say in self-defense. But Job here says, that such was his confidence in his own sincerity and truth, that he could make his appeal to God, even though he knew that he had hitherto gone against him, and treated him as if he were guilty.

    Who hath vexed my soul - Margin, as in Hebrew "made my soul bitter." That is, who has greatly afflicted me; compare 2 Kings 4:27, margin, and Ruth 1:20.

    Wesley's Notes on Job 27:2

    27:2 Who - Though he knows my integrity, yet doth not plead my cause against my friends.
    Book: Job